Advanced search
Start date
Betweenand

Relationship between muscle injury in Brazilian elite athletes and polymorphisms of Angiotensin I converting enzyme, bradykinin receptor B2 and CK-MM

Grant number: 12/10743-8
Support type:Scholarships in Brazil - Post-Doctorate
Effective date (Start): September 01, 2012
Effective date (End): August 31, 2013
Field of knowledge:Biological Sciences - Genetics
Principal Investigator:João Bosco Pesquero
Grantee:Sandro Soares de Almeida
Home Institution: Escola Paulista de Medicina (EPM). Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP). Campus São Paulo. São Paulo , SP, Brazil
Associated research grant:08/06676-8 - Cellular and molecular biology of the kallikrein-kinin and renin-angiotensin systems, AP.TEM

Abstract

After the end of Human Genome Project and the establishment of the complete sequence of our genetic code, biologists' interest has shifted to the analysis of variations in non-repetitive sequences present in the genome, the most common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and also insertion and deletion polymorphisms. As a rule, these polymorphisms have no effect on cell function, however many of them are highly related diseases and the influence of drugs on the cellular response. Furthermore, the study of these polymorphisms can be used in various fields of biomedicine, pharmacology and medicine in sport for the study of physical fitness and inflammatory processes. According to recent studies, several polymorphisms of the genes related to muscular, cardiovascular system and cellular metabolism affect the efficiency of expression or the protein encoded by these genes, resulting in greater or lesser ability to exercise and muscle injury. Many of these changes were more prevalent among practitioners of a particular type of exercise or even prevalent in people with higher level injury or exercise intolerance. In order to obtain a genetic tool as an indicator of physical performance for athletes and non athletes from Brazil, the project aims at validating the genes related to physical performance and muscle injury through genotyping of athletes of today and past.