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The Eldorado of Desinherited Indians, slaves, migrants, fugitives and the expansion to the west of the Amazon (1850-1880)

Grant number: 15/08009-2
Support type:Scholarships abroad - Research Internship - Doctorate
Effective date (Start): September 01, 2015
Effective date (End): June 30, 2016
Field of knowledge:Humanities - History - History of Brazil
Principal Investigator:Maria Helena Pereira Toledo Machado
Grantee:Antonio Alexandre Isidio Cardoso
Supervisor abroad: Barbara Weinstein
Home Institution: Faculdade de Filosofia, Letras e Ciências Humanas (FFLCH). Universidade de São Paulo (USP). São Paulo , SP, Brazil
Local de pesquisa : New York University, United States  
Associated to the scholarship:13/08345-7 - The Eldorado of the disinherited: Indians, slaves, migrants, fugitives and the expansion to western Amazon. (1850-1880), BP.DR

Abstract

The doctoral research "The Eldorado of Disinherited: Indians, slaves, migrants, fugitives and the expansion to the west of the Amazon (1850-1880)", funded by FAPESP and developed with the Postgraduate Program of Social History of USP, has the objective of discussing the social roles of forest dwellers in the border movement in the Amazon in the nineteenth century. The study has been conducted based on various sources, such as police documentation, official, journals, literature, travelers' chronicles, among other types, especially obtained in archives and libraries in Belém and Manaus. The research has followed some leads based on the acquired documents, and we chose three analytical paths as conductors: 1-deepening the research on border movement taking into account the social ballasting prior to the starch "boom"; 2-analysis of travelers testimonies in order to investigate the agencies of their local counterparts under the front of expansion; 3- understanding of control measures and the civil statute of the inhabitants of the cities, towns and forests in the Amazon in the nineteenth century. To carry out such issues, we consider fundamental the access to the New York Public Library's collection, the second largest US library, which holds innumerable works on travelers' paths through the Amazon along with several rubber industry periodicals. In this regard, we request research internship with the Department of history at New York University (NYU), under the supervision of Professor Barbara Weinstein, a researcher of the Amazon theme with important works published on the rubber rush in various dimensions of the process. It is considered therefore that possibility of this internship shall provide the thesis qualified materials for its development, with the possibility of new sources and research dialogues at NYU. (AU)