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Multi-temporal airborne LIDAR for quantifying aboveground biomass stocks and canopy structure dynamics in fire-affected forests in Central Amazon

Grant number: 18/24457-3
Support type:Scholarships abroad - Research Internship - Doctorate
Effective date (Start): May 01, 2019
Effective date (End): April 30, 2020
Field of knowledge:Biological Sciences - Ecology
Principal Investigator:Luiz Eduardo Oliveira e Cruz de Aragão
Grantee:Aline Pontes Lopes
Supervisor abroad: Scott Christopher Stark
Home Institution: Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE). Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, Inovações e Comunicações (Brasil). São José dos Campos , SP, Brazil
Local de pesquisa : Michigan State University (MSU), United States  
Associated to the scholarship:16/21043-8 - Airborne LIDAR for quantifying changes in biomass stocks and structural dynamics in fire-damaged forests in Central Amazon, BP.DR

Abstract

LiDAR remote sensing is laser scanning technology which is being extensively used to monitor vast and remote forest areas in recent years. The application, evaluation and improvement of already developed LiDAR processing techniques are thus important to investigate human and climate-induced forest degradation in the Amazon. In this context, the present BEPE project covers all LiDAR-related goals, processing and analyses, which were detailed in the main Ph.D. project (grant no 2016/21043-8), approved by FAPESP in 2017. Thus, we propose to use multi-temporal airborne LiDAR data to describe and analyze spatiotemporal changes in aboveground biomass and canopy structure of terra firme forest areas in Central Amazon after a fire event. To achieve this objective, LiDAR-derived height metrics and models as well as leaf area and light transmittance distributions and profiles will be used to investigate how biomass and carbon stocks, canopy height, upper canopy tree mortality and forest recovery (growth and recruitment) change over time. By fully accomplishing these analyses, we expect to improve our understanding of general forest functioning as well as fire-mediated degradation and recovery processes. During the proposed visiting period, we also envisage the publication of the second chapter of the PhD Thesis.