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Evaluation of the biological activity of topical formulations of budesonide in inflammatory skin models

Grant number: 19/05100-0
Support type:Scholarships abroad - Research Internship - Post-doctor
Effective date (Start): August 01, 2019
Effective date (End): July 31, 2020
Field of knowledge:Health Sciences - Pharmacy
Principal Investigator:Daniele Ribeiro de Araujo
Grantee:Estefânia Vangelie Ramos Campos
Supervisor abroad: Prof Dr Sarah Hedtrich
Home Institution: Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas (CCNH). Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC). Ministério da Educação (Brasil). Santo André , SP, Brazil
Local de pesquisa : University of British Columbia (UBC), Canada  
Associated to the scholarship:17/24402-1 - PH and temperature sensitive drug nanocarriers for skin applications, BP.PD

Abstract

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory skin disorder characterized by intense itching and recurrent eczematous lesions. Although the pathogenesis of this disorder is not completely understood, it appears to result from the complex interplay between defects in skin barrier function, environmental and infectious agents, and immune abnormalities. The current therapies for AD involve the use of topical corticosteroids and/or topical calcineurin inhibitors. A number of therapeutic agents are available for the treatment of AD. However, topical delivery to the skin has been a consistent challenge for researchers, because of the barrier nature of skin. The present project will explore the novel PLGA nanoparticles loading budesonide researched for AD therapy via topical route. Feasibility of this nanoformulation for AD treatment will be evaluated employing in vitro skin models emulating the AD symptoms. Through this model, the pharmacodynamics of these nanoformulations, will be elucidated through the evaluation of inflammatory cytokines, which are dysregulated in this disease. Furthermore, in this proposal it is also intended to analyze the permeation of these carrier systems fluorescently labeled on human skin.