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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

Adverse drug reactions and kinetics of cisplatin excretion in urine of patients undergoing cisplatin chemotherapy and radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: a prospective study

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Author(s):
Visacri, Marilia Berlofa ; Pincinato, Eder de Carvalho ; Ferrari, Graziele Baldan ; Franca Quintanilha, Julia Coelho ; Mazzola, Priscila Gava ; Passos Lima, Carmen Silvia ; Moriel, Patricia
Total Authors: 7
Document type: Journal article
Source: DARU-JOURNAL OF PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES; v. 25, APR 24 2017.
Web of Science Citations: 5
Abstract

Background: Cisplatin is a high-potency anticancer agent; however, it causes significant adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Potential pharmacokinetic markers must be studied to predict or prevent cisplatin-induced ADRs and achieve better prognosis. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between ADRs and kinetics of cisplatin excretion in the urine of patients undergoing high-dose cisplatin chemotherapy and radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Methods: Outpatients with head and neck cancer received a first cycle of high-dose cisplatin chemotherapy (80-100 mg/m(2)) concurrent to radiotherapy. ADRs (haematological, renal, and gastrointestinal reactions) were classified based on severity by National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE, version 4, grade 0-4). The kinetics of cisplatin excretion in urine was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography over three time periods: 0-12, 12-24, and 24-48 h after the administration of cisplatin. Spearman Correlation test and regression analysis were performed to assess the relationship between ADRs and cisplatin excretion in the urine. Results: In total, 59 patients with a mean age of 55.6 +/- 9.4 years were analysed; most patients were male (86.4%), white (79.7%), and with pharyngeal tumours in advanced stages (66.1%). The most frequently observed ADRs were anaemia (81.4%), lymphopenia (78%), and nausea (64.4%); mostly grades 1 and 2 of toxicity. The mean cisplatin excretion was 70.3 +/- 64.4, 7.3 +/- 6.3, and 5 +/- 4 mu g/mg creatinine at 0-12, 12-24, and 24-48 h, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that the amount of cisplatin excreted did not influence the severity of ADRs. Conclusions: The most frequent ADRs were anaemia, lymphopenia, and nausea. Grades 1 and 2 were the severities for most ADRs. The period over which the highest cisplatin excretion observed was 0-12 h after chemotherapy, and cisplatin excretion could not predict toxicity. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 12/01807-2 - Pharmacogenetics of cisplatin in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma
Grantee:Carmen Silvia Passos Lima
Support type: Regular Research Grants
FAPESP's process: 14/18294-3 - Evaluation of the use of N-acetylcysteine attenuating cisplatin-induced toxicities by oxidative stress in head and neck cancer patients
Grantee:Patricia Moriel
Support type: Regular Research Grants
FAPESP's process: 14/04744-7 - Evaluation of the use of N-acetylcysteine attenuating cisplatin-induced toxicities by oxidative stress in head and neck cancer patients
Grantee:Marília Berlofa Visacri
Support type: Scholarships in Brazil - Doctorate