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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

Higher IQ in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: Dodging cognitive obstacles and ``masking{''} impairments

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Author(s):
Rzezak, Patricia [1, 2, 3] ; Moschetta, Sylvie Paes [2] ; Mendonca, Melanie [2] ; Maia Nobre Paiva, Maria Luisa [2] ; Coan, Ana Carolina [4] ; Guerreiro, Carlos [4] ; Ramos Valente, Kette Dualibi [1, 2, 3]
Total Authors: 7
Affiliation:
[1] Univ Sao Paulo, Ctr Interdisciplinary Res Appl Neurosci NAPNA, Sao Paulo, SP - Brazil
[2] Univ Sao Paulo, Dept Psychiat, Clin Neurophysiol Lab, Sch Med, Sao Paulo, SP - Brazil
[3] Univ Sao Paulo, Grp Study Cognit & Psychiat Disorders Epilepsy Cl, Sao Paulo, SP - Brazil
[4] Univ Campinas UNICAMP, Dept Neurol, Campinas, SP - Brazil
Total Affiliations: 4
Document type: Journal article
Source: Epilepsy & Behavior; v. 86, p. 124-130, SEP 2018.
Web of Science Citations: 1
Abstract

Executive deficits and impulsiveness are extensively reported in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). Previous literature suggests that intelligence may mediate these deficits. In this study, we evaluated and compared the performance of adults with JME with high and low intelligence quotient (IQ) and controls on tasks for executive function (EF) and impulsive trails. We investigated the neuropsychological performance of 53 adults with JME and below average IQ (57% women; 26.9 {[}+/- 7.88] years; mean IQ: 89.8 {[}+/- 5.1]), 26 adults with JME and average or above average IQ (53.8% women; 28.2 {[}+/- 9.33] years; mean IQ: 110.7 {[}+/- 8.3]), 38 controls with below average IQ (55% women; 28.4 {[}+/- 8.4] years; mean IQ: 90.1 {[}+/- 5.8]), and 31 controls with average or above average IQ (61.3% women; 32.20 {[}+/- 11.3] years; mean IQ: 111.6{[}+/- 10.5]) with a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests that measure executive/attentional function. Impulsive traits were assessed using the Cloninger et al.'s Temperament and Character Inventory (novelty seeking (NS) domain). The group with JME with higher IQ presented worse performance compared with controls with higher IQ on Controlled Oral Word Association (COWA) and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) (errors). This group showed worse performance than controls with lower IQ on Stroop Color-Word Test (SCT) 1, Trail Making (TM) A, COWA, and WCST (errors). Patients with lower IQ showed worse performance than controls with higher IQ on Digit Span Forward (DSF), Digit Span Backward (DSB), SCT1, SCT2, SCT3, TM A, COWA, and WCST (errors and failure to maintain set). Patients with lower IQ showed worse performance than controls with lower IQ on DSF, DSB, SCTI, SCT2, SCT3, TM A, TM B, COWA, and WCST (errors and failure to maintain set). Patients from groups with low and high IQ showed higher scores than controls with higher and lower IQ on impulsivity for NS1 and NS2 (except for patients with higher IQ versus controls with lower IQ). Adults with JME and higher IQ show less evidence of EF deficits compared with those with JME and below average IQ suggesting that a higher degree of intellectual efficiency may act as a compensatory mechanism. However, it does not minimize some aspects of impulsive traits. Patients with JME and higher cognitive reserve may create strategies to dodge their cognitive obstacles. In this context, intelligence may protect and, at the same time, ``mask{''} impairments that could be detected earlier. (C) 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 12/09025-3 - Executive and memory functions of patients with mesial temporal sclerosis: association between neuropsychological evaluation and new neuroimage techniques
Grantee:Geraldo Busatto Filho
Support type: Regular Research Grants
FAPESP's process: 13/11361-4 - Association study of polymorphisms in serotoninergic pathway and temporal lobe epilepsy caused by hippocampal sclerosis
Grantee:Kette Dualibi Ramos Valente
Support type: Regular Research Grants