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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

Why is Amazonia a `source' of biodiversity? Climate-mediated dispersal and synchronous speciation across the Andes in an avian group (Tityrinae)

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Author(s):
Musher, Lukas J. [1, 2] ; Ferreira, Mateus [3] ; Auerbach, Anya L. [4] ; McKay, Jessica [1] ; Cracraft, Joel [1]
Total Authors: 5
Affiliation:
[1] Amer Museum Nat Hist, Dept Ornithol, Cent Pk West, 79th St, New York, NY 10024 - USA
[2] Amer Museum Nat Hist, Richard Gilder Grad Sch, Cent Pk West, 79th St, New York, NY 10024 - USA
[3] INPA, Programa Posgrad Genet Conservacao & Biol Evolut, Manaus, Amazonas - Brazil
[4] Univ Chicago, Dept Biol Sci, Collegiate Div, 1101 East 57th St, Chicago, IL 60637 - USA
Total Affiliations: 4
Document type: Journal article
Source: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; v. 286, n. 1900 APR 3 2019.
Web of Science Citations: 1
Abstract

Amazonia is a `source' of biodiversity for other Neotropical ecosystems, but which conditions trigger in situ speciation and emigration is contentious. Three hypotheses for how communities have assembled include (1) a stochastic model wherein chance dispersal events lead to gradual emigration and species accumulation, (2) diversity-dependence wherein successful dispersal events decline through time due to ecological limits, and (3) barrier displacement wherein environmental change facilitates dispersal to other biomes via transient habitat corridors. We sequenced thousands of molecular markers for the Neotropical Tityrinae (Aves) and applied a novel filtering protocol to identify loci with high utility for dated phylogenomics. We used these loci to estimate divergence times and model Tityrinae's evolutionary history. We detected a prominent role for speciation driven by barriers including synchronous speciation across the Andes and found that dispersal increased toward the present. Because diversification was continuous but dispersal was non-random over time, we show that barrier displacement better explains Tityrinae's history than stochasticity or diversity-dependence. We propose that Amazonia is a source of biodiversity because (1) it is a relic of a biome that was once more extensive, (2) environmentally mediated corridors facilitated emigration and (3) constant diversification is attributed to a spatially heterogeneous landscape that is perpetually dynamic through time. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 12/50260-6 - Structure and evolution of the Amazonian biota and its environment: an integrative approach
Grantee:Lúcia Garcez Lohmann
Support type: BIOTA-FAPESP Program - Thematic Grants