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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

Comparative physiology investigations support a role for histidine-containing dipeptides in intracellular acid base regulation of skeletal muscle

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Author(s):
Dolan, Eimear [1] ; Saunders, Bryan [1, 2] ; Harris, Roger Charles [3] ; Bicudo, Jose Eduardo Pereira Wilken [4] ; Bishop, David John [5, 6] ; Sale, Craig [7] ; Gualano, Bruno [1]
Total Authors: 7
Affiliation:
[1] Univ Sao Paulo, Rheumatol Div, Appl Physiol & Nutr Res Grp, Fac Med FMUSP, Sao Paulo - Brazil
[2] Univ Sao Paulo, Inst Orthopaed & Traumatol, Fac Med FMUSP, Sao Paulo - Brazil
[3] Junipa Ltd, Newmarket, Suffolk - England
[4] Univ Wollongong, Sch Biol Sci, Wollongong, NSW - Australia
[5] Victoria Univ, Inst Hlth & Sport IHes, Coll Sport & Exercise Sci, Melbourne, Vic - Australia
[6] Edith Cowan Univ, Sch Med & Hlth Sci, Churchlands, WA - Australia
[7] Nottingham Trent Univ, Sch Sci & Technol, Musculoskeletal Physiol Res Grp, Sport Hlth & Performance Enhancement Res Ctr, Nottingham - England
Total Affiliations: 7
Document type: Review article
Source: COMPARATIVE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY A-MOLECULAR & INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY; v. 234, p. 77-86, AUG 2019.
Web of Science Citations: 2
Abstract

Histidine containing dipeptides (HCDs: carnosine, anserine and balenine) have numerous therapeutic and ergogenic properties, but there is a lack of consensus on the mechanistic pathways through which they function. Potential roles include intracellular buffering, neutralisation of reactive species, and calcium regulation. Comparative investigations of the HCD content of various species provide unique insight into their most likely mechanisms of action. This review chronologically describes how the comparative physiology studies, conducted since the beginning of the 20th century, have shaped our understanding of the physiological roles of HCDs. The investigation of a wide range of physiologically distinct species indicates that those species with a strong reliance on non-oxidative forms of energy production are abundant in HCDs. These include: whales who experience long periods of hypoxia while diving; racehorses and greyhound dogs who have highly developed sprint abilities, and chickens and turkeys whose limited capacity for flight is largely fuelled by their white, glycolytic, muscle. Additionally, a higher HCD content in the Type 2 muscle fibres of various species (which have greater capacity for non-oxidative metabolism) was consistently observed. The pKa of the HCDs render them ideally suited to act as intracellular physicochemical buffers within the pH transit range of the skeletal muscle. As such, their abundance in species which show a greater reliance on non-oxidative forms of energy metabolism, and which experience regular challenges to acid-base homeostasis, provides strong evidence that intracellular proton buffering is an important function of the HCDs in skeletal muscle. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 17/09635-0 - Factors determining the carnosine content of human skeletal muscle: Influence of age and sex
Grantee:Eimear Bernadette Dolan
Support type: Scholarships in Brazil - Post-Doctorate
FAPESP's process: 16/50438-0 - Nutritional suplementation and exercise to optimize exercise performance: focus on individual responses and a step towards personalized sports nutrition
Grantee:Bryan Saunders
Support type: Research Grants - Young Investigators Grants
FAPESP's process: 13/14746-4 - Carnosine metabolism in skeletal muscle: a multi-approach study
Grantee:Bruno Gualano
Support type: Research Projects - Thematic Grants
FAPESP's process: 17/04973-4 - Nutritional supplementation and exercise to optimise exercise performance: focus on individual responses and a step towards personalized sports nutrition
Grantee:Bryan Saunders
Support type: Scholarships in Brazil - Young Researchers
FAPESP's process: 15/11328-2 - Carnosine metabolism in skeletal muscle: a multi-approach study. Substudy 3: exploring carnosine role in skeletal muscle
Grantee:Eimear Bernadette Dolan
Support type: Scholarships in Brazil - Post-Doctorate