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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

Climatic and local stressor interactions threaten tropical forests and coral reefs

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Author(s):
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Franca, Filipe M. [1, 2] ; Benkwitt, Cassadra E. [1] ; Paalta, GuaiAupe [3] ; Robinson, James P. W. [1] ; Graham, Nicholas A. J. [1] ; Tylianakis, Jason M. [3] ; Berenguer, Erika [1, 4] ; Lees, Alexander C. [5, 6] ; Ferreirav, Joice [2, 7] ; Louzada, Julio [8] ; Barlow, Jos [1, 8]
Total Authors: 11
Affiliation:
[1] Univ Lancaster, Lancaster Environm Ctr, Lancaster LA1 4YQ - England
[2] Embrapa Amazonia Oriental, Tray Dr Eneas Pinheiro S-N, CP 48, BR-66095100 Belem, PA - Brazil
[3] Univ Canterbury, Sch Biol Sci, Christchurch - New Zealand
[4] Univ Oxford, Environm Change Inst, Oxford OX1 3QY - England
[5] Manchester Metropolitan Univ, Sch Sci & Environm, Manchester - England
[6] Cornell Univ, Cornell Lab Ornithol, Ithaca, NY 14850 - USA
[7] Univ Fed Para, Inst Geociencias, BR-66075110 Belem, PA - Brazil
[8] Univ Fed Lavras, Dept Biol, BR-37200000 Lavras, MG - Brazil
Total Affiliations: 8
Document type: Review article
Source: PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; v. 375, n. 1794, SI MAR 16 2020.
Web of Science Citations: 1
Abstract

Tropical forests and coral reefs host a disproportionately large share of global biodiversity and provide ecosystem functions and services used by millions of people. Yet, ongoing climate change is leading to an increase in frequency and magnitude of extreme climatic events in the tropics, which, in combination with other local human disturbances, is leading to unprecedented negative ecological consequences for tropical forests and coral reefs. Here, we provide an overview of how and where climate extremes are affecting the most biodiverse ecosystems on Earth and summarize how interactions between global, regional and local stressors are affecting tropical forest and coral reef systems through impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem resilience. We also discuss some key challenges and opportunities to promote mitigation and adaptation to a changing climate at local and global scales. This article is part of the theme issue `Climate change and ecosystems: threats, opportunities and solutions'. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 12/51872-5 - ECOFOR: Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in degraded and recovering Amazonian and Atlantic Forests
Grantee:Carlos Alfredo Joly
Support type: BIOTA-FAPESP Program - Thematic Grants