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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

Use of plant materials for the bioremediation of soil from an industrial site

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Author(s):
Nunes, Danielle Aparecida Duarte [1] ; Salgado, Andrea Medeiros [1] ; Gama-Rodrigues, Emanuela Forestieri da [2] ; Taketani, Rodrigo Gouvea [3, 4] ; Cunha, Claudia Duarte da [5] ; Servulo, Eliana Flavia Camporese [1]
Total Authors: 6
Affiliation:
[1] Univ Fed Rio de Janeiro, Ctr Tecnol, Sch Chem, Bloco E, Rio De Janeiro - Brazil
[2] State Univ North Fluminense, Ctr Agr Sci & Technol, Soil Lab, Rio De Janeiro - Brazil
[3] Univ Sao Paulo, Luiz de Queiroz Coll Agr, Dept Soil Sci, Piracicaba, SP - Brazil
[4] Embrapa Environm, Lab Environm Microbiol, Jaguari una, SP - Brazil
[5] MCTIC Minist Sci Technol Innovat & Commun, CETEM, Ctr Mineral Technol, Av Pedro Calmon 900, BR-21941908 Rio De Janeiro, RJ - Brazil
Total Affiliations: 5
Document type: Review article
Source: JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND HEALTH PART A-TOXIC/HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING; v. 55, n. 6 FEB 2020.
Web of Science Citations: 1
Abstract

Bioremediation is one of the existing techniques applied for treating oil-contaminated soil, which can be improved by the incorporation of low-cost nutritional materials. This study aimed to assess the addition of two low-cost plant residues, sugarcane bagasse (SCB) and leaf litter (LL) of the forest leguminous Mimosa caesalpiniifolia plant (sabia), either separately or combined, to a contaminated soil from a petroleum refinery area, analyzed after 90 days of treatment. Individually, both amounts of SCB (20 and 40 g kg(-1)) favored the growth of total heterotrophic bacteria and total fungi, while LL at 20 g kg(-1) better stimulated the hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism's activity in the soil. However, no TPH removal was observed under any of these conditions. Higher microbial growth was detected by the application of both plant residues in multicontaminated soil. The maximum TPH removal of 30% was achieved in amended soil with 20 g kg(-1) SCB and 20 kg(-1) LL. All the experimental conditions revealed changes in the microbial community structure, related to the handling of the soil, with abundance of Alphaproteobacteria. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the plant residues SCB and LL as low-cost nutritional materials for biodegradation of hydrocarbon in real oil contaminated soil by indigenous populations. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 13/23470-2 - Metagenomics and Metatranscriptomics of the Microbial Community involved in the Transformation of Organic Carbon in Mangrove Sediments of the São Paulo State
Grantee:Rodrigo Gouvêa Taketani
Support type: Scholarships in Brazil - Young Researchers