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(Reference retrieved automatically from SciELO through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

Oral behaviors, bruxism, malocclusion and painful temporomandibular joint clicking: is there an association?

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Author(s):
Rodrigo Lorenzi POLUHA [1] ; Giancarlo De la Torre CANALES [2] ; Leonardo Rigoldi BONJARDIM [3] ; Paulo César Rodrigues CONTI [4]
Total Authors: 4
Affiliation:
[1] Universidade de São Paulo. Bauru School of Dentistry. Department of Prosthodontics - Brasil
[2] Universidade de São Paulo. Bauru School of Dentistry. Department of Prosthodontics - Brasil
[3] Universidade de São Paulo. Bauru School of Dentistry. Department of Biological Sciences - Brasil
[4] Universidade de São Paulo. Bauru School of Dentistry. Department of Prosthodontics - Brasil
Total Affiliations: 4
Document type: Journal article
Source: Brazilian Oral Research; v. 35, 2021-08-06.
Abstract

Abstract The present cross-sectional case-control study aimed to determine if there is an association between specific oral behaviors, sleep bruxism (SB), awake bruxism (AB), and painful temporomandibular joint (TMJ) clicking. Ninety individuals were dived into three groups; Group 1 (n = 30): painful TMJ clicking; Group 2 (n = 30): painless TMJ clicking; and Group 3 (n = 30): control group. The following clinical data were studied: oral behaviors (unilateral chewing, gum chewing, nail biting, foreign objects biting, leaning with jaw against the hand, and sleeping in a position that pressures the jaw), SB, AB (including the frequency in 10 days, evaluated by ecological momentary assessment), and malocclusions investigated based on clinical inspections (anterior open bite, posterior cross-bite, abnormal overbite/overjet, occlusal guidance, mediotrusive and/or laterotrusive interferences, retruded contact position to maximum intercuspation slide, missing posterior teeth). All statistical tests (Kolmogorov-Smirnov, chi-square, and one-way ANOVA) were performed with a 5% significance level. Group 1 had the highest frequency of and a significant association with leaning with jaw in the hand, sleeping position that pressures the jaw, gum chewing, nail biting, and AB (p<0.05). Gum chewing, nail biting, and AB were associated with Group 2 only when compared to Group 3 (p<0.05). No significant difference among groups was found for other behaviors (unilateral chewing and foreign objects biting), SB, and all malocclusions (p>0.05). It can be concluded that patients with painful TMJ clicking had a higher frequency of and a significant association with some specific harmful behaviors and AB. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 17/21674-0 - Comparison of the effectiveness of botulinum toxin type A in patients with refractory chronic orofacial pain according to different somatosensory profiles
Grantee:Giancarlo de La Torre Canales
Support Opportunities: Scholarships in Brazil - Post-Doctorate