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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

PHYSIOLOGICAL, PERFORMANCE, AND NUTRITIONAL PROFILE OF THE BRAZILIAN OLYMPIC WUSHU (KUNG-FU) TEAM

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Author(s):
Artioli, Guilherme Giannini [1, 2] ; Gualano, Bruno [1] ; Franchini, Emerson [2] ; Batista, Rafael Novaes [1] ; Polacow, Viviane Ozores [1] ; Lancha, Jr., Antonio Herbert [1]
Total Authors: 6
Affiliation:
[1] Univ Sao Paulo, Sch Phys Educ & Sport, Lab Appl Nutr & Metab, Sao Paulo - Brazil
[2] Univ Sao Paulo, Sch Phys Educ & Sport, Combat Sports & Martial Arts Res Grp, Sao Paulo - Brazil
Total Affiliations: 2
Document type: Journal article
Source: JOURNAL OF STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING RESEARCH; v. 23, n. 1, p. 20-25, JAN 2009.
Web of Science Citations: 34
Abstract

Artioli, GG, Gualano, B, Franchini, E, Batista, RN, Polacow, VO, and Lancha, AH Jr. Physiological, performance, and nutritional profile of the Brazilian Olympic Wushu (kung-fu) team. J Strength Cond Res 23(1): 20-25, 2009-The purpose of the present study was to determine physiological, nutritional, and performance profiles of elite Olympic Wushu (kung-fu) athletes. Ten men and four women elite athletes took part in the study. They completed the following tests: body composition, nutritional assessment, upper-body Wingate Test, vertical jump, lumbar isometric strength, and flexibility. Blood lactate was determined at rest and after the Wingate Test. Blood lactate was also determined during a training session (combat and Taolu training). We found low body fat (men: 9.5 +/- 6.3%; women: 18.0 +/- 4.8%), high flexibility (sit-and-reach-men: 45.5 +/- 6.1 cm; women: 44.0 +/- 6.3 cm), high leg power (vertical jump-men: 37.7 +/- 8.4 cm; women: 32.3 +/- 1.1 cm), high lumbar isometric strength (men: 159 6 13 cm; women: 94 6 6 cm), moderate arm mean and peak power (Wingate Test-men: 4.1 +/- 0.4 and 5.8 +/- 0.5 W.kg(-1), respectively; women: 2.5 +/- 0.3 and 3.4 +/- 0.3 W.kg(-1), respectively), and elevated blood lactate after the Wingate Test (men: 10.8 +/- 2.0 mmol.L(-1); women: 10.2 +/- 2.0 mmol.L(-1)) and during training (combat: 12.0 +/- 1.8 mmol.L(-1); Taolu: 7.7 +/- 3.3 mmol.L(-1)). Men athletes consume a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet, whereas women consume a moderate, high-carbohydrate diet. Energy consumption was markedly variable. In conclusion, Olympic Wushu seems to be a highly anaerobic-dependent combat sport. Low body fat, high flexibility, leg anaerobic power, isometric strength, and moderately high arm anaerobic power seem to be important for successful competitive performance. (AU)