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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

Watershed responses to Amazon soya bean cropland expansion and intensification

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Author(s):
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Neill, Christopher [1, 2] ; Coe, Michael T. [3, 4] ; Riskin, Shelby H. [2] ; Krusche, Alex V. [5] ; Elsenbeer, Helmut [6] ; Macedo, Marcia N. [3, 4] ; McHorney, Richard [1] ; Lefebvre, Paul [3] ; Davidson, Eric A. [3] ; Scheffler, Raphael [6] ; Figueira, Adelaine Michela e Silva [5] ; Porder, Stephen [2] ; Deegan, Linda A. [1]
Total Authors: 13
Affiliation:
[1] Marine Biol Lab, Ctr Ecosyst, Woods Hole, MA 02543 - USA
[2] Brown Univ, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Providence, RI - USA
[3] Woods Hole Res Ctr, Falmouth, MA 02540 - USA
[4] Inst Pesquisa Ambiental Amazonia, BR-66035170 Belem, Para - Brazil
[5] Univ Sao Paulo, Ctr Energia Nucl Agr, BR-13416000 Sao Paulo - Brazil
[6] Univ Potsdam, Inst Earth & Environm, D-14476 Potsdam - Germany
Total Affiliations: 6
Document type: Journal article
Source: PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; v. 368, n. 1619, SI JUN 5 2013.
Web of Science Citations: 37
Abstract

The expansion and intensification of soya bean agriculture in southeastern Amazonia can alter watershed hydrology and biogeochemistry by changing the land cover, water balance and nutrient inputs. Several new insights on the responses of watershed hydrology and biogeochemistry to deforestation in Mato Grosso have emerged from recent intensive field campaigns in this region. Because of reduced evapotranspiration, total water export increases threefold to fourfold in soya bean watersheds compared with forest. However, the deep and highly permeable soils on the broad plateaus on which much of the soya bean cultivation has expanded buffer small soya bean watersheds against increased stormflows. Concentrations of nitrate and phosphate do not differ between forest or soya bean watersheds because fixation of phosphorus fertilizer by iron and aluminium oxides and anion exchange of nitrate in deep soils restrict nutrient movement. Despite resistance to biogeochemical change, streams in soya bean watersheds have higher temperatures caused by impoundments and reduction of bordering riparian forest. In larger rivers, increased water flow, current velocities and sediment flux following deforestation can reshape stream morphology, suggesting that cumulative impacts of deforestation in small watersheds will occur at larger scales. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 08/58089-9 - The role of rivers on the regional carbon cycle
Grantee:Maria Victoria Ramos Ballester
Support type: Research Program on Global Climate Change - Thematic Grants