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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

Bacterial community composition of anthropogenic biochar and Amazonian anthrosols assessed by 16S rRNA gene 454 pyrosequencing

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Author(s):
Taketani, Rodrigo Gouvea [1, 2] ; Lima, Amanda Barbosa [1] ; Jesus, Ederson da Conceicao [3, 4] ; Teixeira, Wenceslau Geraldes [5] ; Tiedje, James M. [3] ; Tsai, Siu Mui [1]
Total Authors: 6
Affiliation:
[1] Univ Sao Paulo, Lab Cellular & Mol Biol, Ctr Energia Nucl Agr, Piracicaba, SP - Brazil
[2] EMBRAPA Meio Ambiente, Lab Microbiol Ambiental, BR-13820000 Jaguariuna, SP - Brazil
[3] Michigan State Univ, Ctr Microbial Ecol, Dept Soil & Crop Sci, E Lansing, MI 48824 - USA
[4] EMBRAPA Agrobiol, Seropedica, RJ - Brazil
[5] EMBRAPA Western Amazon, Manaus, AM - Brazil
Total Affiliations: 5
Document type: Journal article
Source: ANTONIE VAN LEEUWENHOEK INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GENERAL AND MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY; v. 104, n. 2, p. 233-242, AUG 2013.
Web of Science Citations: 27
Abstract

Biochar (BC) is a common minor constituent of soils and is usually derived from the burning of wood materials. In the case of Amazonian dark earth (ADE) soils, the increased amount of this material is believed to be due to anthropogenic action by ancient indigenous populations. In this study, we use 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to assess the bacterial diversity observed in the BC found in ADEs as well as in the dark earth itself and the adjacent Acrisol. Samples were taken from two sites, one cultivated with manioc and one with secondary forest cover. Analyses revealed that the community structure found in each sample had unique features. At a coarse phylogenetic resolution, the most abundant phyla in all sequence libraries were Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Proteobacteria that were present in similar relative abundance across all samples. However, the class composition varied between them highlighting the difference between the Acrisol and the remaining samples. This result was also corroborated by the comparison of the OTU composition (at 97 % identity). Also, soil coverage has shown an effect over the community structure observed in all samples. This pattern was found to be significant through unweighted UniFrac as well as P tests. These results indicate that, although the ADEs are found in patches within the Acrisols, the contrasting characteristics found between them led to the development of significantly different communities. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 06/06700-0 - Microbial diversity in the Central and Oriental Amazonian Anthropogenic Dark Earth: Detection of metanogenic Archaea, their functional role and contribution to the bacterial structure communities in ADE and adjacent sites
Grantee:Tsai Siu Mui
Support type: Regular Research Grants