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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

Two New Cases of 1p21.3 Deletions and an Unbalanced Translocation t(8;12) among Individuals with Syndromic Obesity

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Author(s):
D'Angelo, Carla S. ; Moller dos Santos, Mauren F. ; Alonso, Luis G. ; Koiffmann, Celia P.
Total Authors: 4
Document type: Journal article
Source: MOLECULAR SYNDROMOLOGY; v. 6, n. 2, p. 63-70, 2015.
Web of Science Citations: 8
Abstract

due to duplication of the GNB3 gene. Thus, our findings add to the existing literature on the clinical description of these new syndromes, providing additional support that these loci are associated with syndromic obesity. We suggest that heterozygous loss of MIR137 may contribute to obesity as well as ID and ASD. Obesity is a highly heritable but genetically heterogeneous disorder. Various well-known microdeletion syndromes (e.g. 1p36, 2q37, 6q16, 9q34, 17p11.2) can cause this phenotype along with intellectual disability (ID) and other findings. Chromosomal microarrays have identified `new' microdeletion/duplication syndromes often associated with obesity. We report on 2 unrelated patients with an overlapping region of deletion at 1p21.3p21.2, and a third patient with a de novo recurrent unbalanced translocation der(8) t(8;12) (p23.1;p13.31), detected by 180K array CGH in a prospective cohort of syndromic obesity patients. Deletion of 1p21.3 is a rare condition, and there have been only 11 cases of the same recurrent translocation between chromosomes 8 and 12 {[}t(8; 12)] reported to date. The former has been associated with ID, autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and mild dysmorphic features, and in 4 patients who were obese or had a tendency to obesity, a minimal overlapping region of 2 genes, DPYD and MIR137, was detected; t(8;12) has recently been recognized to cause a childhood obesity syndrome due to duplication of the GNB3 gene. Thus, our findings add to the existing literature on the clinical description of these new syndromes, providing additional support that these loci are associated with syndromic obesity. We suggest that heterozygous loss of MIR137 may contribute to obesity as well as ID and ASD. (C) 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel (AU)

FAPESP's process: 98/14254-2 - The Human Genome Research Center
Grantee:Mayana Zatz
Support type: Research Grants - Research, Innovation and Dissemination Centers - RIDC