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(Reference retrieved automatically from SciELO through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

Artificial nest predation in Atlantic Forest Island: testing the place and the different types of egg

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Author(s):
Ariane D. Alvarez ; Mauro Galetti [2]
Total Authors: 2
Document type: Journal article
Source: Revista Brasileira de Zoologia; v. 24, n. 4, p. 1011-1016, 2007-12-00.
Field of knowledge: Biological Sciences - Ecology
Abstract

Experiments on artificial nests are usually used to test ecological hypothesis and behavioural that affects the predation of natural bird nests. It is has been discussed about the size of the egg, texture and color affecting predation rate, but a few studies evaluate which egg type is more appropriate to simulate nest predation in tropical areas. The objective of this work was to compare the predation of different models of eggs (Coturnix coturnix, plasticine and Serinus canarius) on the ground and understory in a island with high abundance of nest predators. The study was carry out in October 2004 at Anchieta Island, Ubatuba, São Paulo, Brazil. The nests on the ground showed a statistical significance difference in the predation of quail eggs, plasticine and canary eggs. However, we did not find differences between plasticine and canaries eggs. The nests in the understory had a different pattern on the ground of quail eggs (25%) and plasticine (28%) and there was a difference when we compare canary eggs with plasticine and quail eggs. Our work pointed out that different eggs may have different predation rates. Therefore, studies that evaluate reproductive fitness of the bird community based on artificial nests must considered different egg types and strata. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 01/14463-5 - Diagnosis of populations of birds and cynegetic mammals in the conservation units of the São Paulo Atlantic Rainforest
Grantee:Mauro Galetti Rodrigues
Support Opportunities: BIOTA-FAPESP Program - Regular Research Grants