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Wheat rhizosphere microbiome and tolerance against the soil borne pathogen Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici

Grant number: 16/13754-1
Support type:Scholarships in Brazil - Post-Doctorate
Effective date (Start): February 01, 2017
Status:Discontinued
Field of knowledge:Agronomical Sciences - Agronomy
Cooperation agreement: Coordination of Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES)
Principal Investigator:Rodrigo Mendes
Grantee:Lilian Simara Abreu Soares Costa
Home Institution: Embrapa Meio-Ambiente. Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária (EMBRAPA). Ministério da Agricultura, Pecuária e Abastecimento (Brasil). Jaguariúna , SP, Brazil
Associated scholarship(s):19/12330-1 - Fungal communities analysis and development of an analytical approach in the wheat rhizosphere microbiome, BE.EP.PD

Abstract

The rhizosphere microbiome is essential for health and development of plants, providing protection against pests and diseases, facilitating the acquisition of nutrients and helping plants to resist the abiotic stresses as well. In this context, plants developed different mechanisms to interact with the environment, including recruitment of microorganisms in the rhizosphere, which is predominantly driven by exudates from the roots. However, domestication of plant species and changes in the agricultural systems over the years caused decrease in the genetic diversity of cultivars that may have affected the ability of plants to establish beneficial associations with rhizosphere microbes. During the last decade there has been significant progress in research about biotic interactions, but little is known about function and biodiversity of these microbial communities in ancestral plant roots compared to the microbial communities of modern plants which may change the defense process in the plant over the years. Thus, this project proposes the study of wheat rhizosphere microbiome from the ancestral and modern plants in the presence of fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici, and to investigate the correlations of the bacterial community structure in rhizosphere and defense process. The data obtained may be informative for the ecosystem, in addition to understanding how these microbial communities challenge the soil pathogens, aiming the development of new approaches in plant breeding, leading to a sustainable agriculture. (AU)