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Impact of local administration of D1 and D2 dopaminergic receptor antagonists on the striatal local field potential (LFP) evoked by cortical stimulation

Grant number: 19/13519-0
Support type:Scholarships abroad - Research Internship - Scientific Initiation
Effective date (Start): August 26, 2019
Effective date (End): November 25, 2019
Field of knowledge:Biological Sciences - Pharmacology - Neuropsychopharmacology
Principal Investigator:Fernando Eduardo Padovan Neto
Grantee:Carlos Henrique Zanello Talarico
Supervisor abroad: Kuei Y Tseng
Home Institution: Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto (FFCLRP). Universidade de São Paulo (USP). Ribeirão Preto , SP, Brazil
Local de pesquisa : University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), United States  
Associated to the scholarship:18/24428-3 - Analysis of spontaneous and cortically evoked activity of striatal medium spiny neurons during the occurrence of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias, BP.IC

Abstract

Local field potentials (LFPs) are generated by large populations of neurons and resemble a sum of signals from neurons present in the vicinity of the recording electrode and represent a technique increasingly used to measure the transmission of neural networks. Our laboratory in Brazil uses animal models of Parkinson's disease to investigate the impact of chronic chronic administration of L-DOPA on the behavior and electrophysiological properties involved in the process of motor information. We use electrophysiology techniques to study the neurons located in the striatum (the main input structure of the base ganglia) and how they respond to the afferent connections arising from the motor cortex. We are interested studying the effects of the motor cortex on the generation of LFPs in the striatum, which is a strong tool for the study of the brain. Our objectives are to learn the procedures necessary to perform the LFP evoked in the striatum by cortical stimulation and to combine this technique with local administration of drugs, specifically D1 (SCH23390) or D2 (eticlopride) antagonists and apply this technique in our current ongoing project. The implication of this project will provide advancement in the development and knowledge of the neurological dysfunctions associated with PD and the importance of understanding the action mechanisms of drugs with therapeutic potential.