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Manipulating elastic waves using topological modes - phase i

Grant number: 19/22464-5
Support type:Scholarships abroad - Research Internship - Post-doctor
Effective date (Start): March 04, 2020
Effective date (End): May 13, 2020
Field of knowledge:Engineering - Mechanical Engineering - Mechanics of Solids
Principal Investigator:Carlos de Marqui Junior
Grantee:Danilo Beli
Supervisor abroad: Massimo Ruzzene
Home Institution: Escola de Engenharia de São Carlos (EESC). Universidade de São Paulo (USP). São Carlos , SP, Brazil
Local de pesquisa : University of Colorado Boulder, United States  
Associated to the scholarship:18/18774-6 - Manipulating mechanical waves using programmable periodic structures, BP.PD

Abstract

Elastic metamaterials have been explored due to their extraordinary properties that allow vibration and acoustic attenuation as well as wave manipulation. The term metamaterial is nowadays employed to designate rationally designed and tailored artificial materials with physical properties not found in nature. The presence of a band gap, a frequency range in which vibration disturbances will not propagate through the structure, is a key feature of metamaterials. Band gaps have paved the way to create acoustic and vibration barriers at low frequencies, seismic shielding, acoustic diodes, and two-dimensional waveguides, among other wave manipulation phenomena. However, wave propagation in metamaterials presents a wide range of open topics that have high potential to address old engineering problems, to create new technologies and to impact the every-day-life. Therefore, in this research project, the motivation is to investigate metamaterials to manipulate elastic waves in a more efficient and versatile way by using concepts from condensed matter physics such as symmetries breaking and topological insulators. Topologically protected wave modes have only recently been considered in the acoustic and elasto-dynamics fields by exploiting topological properties such as the localized modes (e.g., edge and interface modes). High order topological insulators, the state-of-art in the field, will be investigated in this project. The main objective in the BEPE is to develop theoretical, numerical and experimental fundamental understanding on breaking symmetries, topological wave modes, and topological insulators, exploring this rich and dynamic research area with interface between physics and engineering.