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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

Trophic State Evolution and Nutrient Trapping Capacity in a Transboundary Subtropical Reservoir: A 25-Year Study

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Author(s):
Fernandes Cunha, Davi Gasparini [1] ; Benassi, Simone Frederigi [2] ; de Falco, Patricia Bortoletto [3] ; Calijuri, Maria do Carmo [1]
Total Authors: 4
Affiliation:
[1] Univ Sao Paulo, Escola Engn Sao Carlos, Dept Hidraul & Saneamento, Ave Trabalhador Sao Carlense 400, BR-13566590 Sao Carlos, SP - Brazil
[2] Itaipu Binac, Ave Presidente Tancredo Neves 6731, BR-85866900 Foz Do Iguacu, PR - Brazil
[3] Fundacao USP, Polo Sao Carlos, Ave Joao Dagnone 1100, BR-13563120 Sao Carlos, SP - Brazil
Total Affiliations: 3
Document type: Journal article
Source: Environmental Management; v. 57, n. 3, p. 649-659, MAR 2016.
Web of Science Citations: 2
Abstract

Artificial reservoirs have been used for drinking water supply, other human activities, flood control and pollution abatement worldwide, providing overall benefits to downstream water quality. Most reservoirs in Brazil were built during the 1970s, but their long-term patterns of trophic status, water chemistry, and nutrient removal are still not very well characterized. We aimed to evaluate water quality time series (1985-2010) data from the riverine and lacustrine zones of the transboundary Itaipu Reservoir (Brazil/Paraguay). We examined total phosphorus and nitrogen, chlorophyll a concentrations, water transparency, and phytoplankton density to look for spatial and temporal trends and correlations with trophic state evolution and nutrient retention. There was significant temporal and spatial water quality variation (P < 0.01, ANCOVA). The results indicated that the water quality and structure of the reservoir were mainly affected by one internal force (hydrodynamics) and one external force (upstream cascading reservoirs). Nutrient and chlorophyll a concentrations tended to be lower in the lacustrine zone and decreased over the 25-year timeframe. Reservoir operational features seemed to be limiting primary production and phytoplankton development, which exhibited a maximum density of 6050 org/mL. The relatively small nutrient concentrations in the riverine zone were probably related to the effect of the cascade reservoirs upstream of Itaipu and led to relatively low removal percentages. Our study suggested that water quality problems may be more pronounced immediately after the filling phase of the artificial reservoirs, associated with the initial decomposition of drowned vegetation at the very beginning of reservoir operation. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 14/02088-5 - Nitrogen biological fixation and uptake by phytoplankton in subtropical reservoirs with different trophic status
Grantee:Davi Gasparini Fernandes Cunha
Support type: Regular Research Grants