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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

The 6 September 2017 X9 Super Flare Observed From Submillimeter to Mid-IR

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Author(s):
Gimenez de Castro, C. G. [1, 2] ; Raulin, J-P [1] ; Silva, J. F. Valle [1] ; Simoes, P. J. A. [3] ; Kudaka, A. S. [1] ; Valio, A. [1]
Total Authors: 6
Affiliation:
[1] Univ Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Ctr Radio Astron & Astrofis Mackenzie, Escola Engn, Sao Paulo - Brazil
[2] Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn, Inst Astron & Fis Espacio, Buenos Aires, DF - Argentina
[3] Univ Glasgow, SUPA Sch Phys & Astron, Glasgow, Lanark - Scotland
Total Affiliations: 3
Document type: Journal article
Source: SPACE WEATHER-THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS; v. 16, n. 9, p. 1261-1268, SEP 2018.
Web of Science Citations: 1
Abstract

Active Region 12673 is the most productive active region of solar cycle 24: in a few days of early September 2017, four X-class and 27 M-class flares occurred. SOL2017-09-06T12:00, an X9.3 flare also produced a two-ribbon white light emission across the sunspot detected by Solar Dynamics Orbiter/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. The flare was observed at 212 and 405 GHz with the arcminute-sized beams of the Solar Submillimeter Telescope focal array while making a solar map and at 10 m, with a 17 arcsec diffraction-limited infrared camera. Images at 10 m revealed that the sunspot gradually increased in brightness while the event proceeded, reaching a temperature similar to quiet Sun values. From the images we derive a lower bound limit of 180-K flare peak excess brightness temperature or 7,000sfu if we consider a similar size as the white light source. The rising phase of mid-IR and white light is similar, although the latter decays faster, and the maximum of the mid-IR and white light emission is similar to 200s delayed from the 15.4-GHz peak occurrence. The submillimeter spectrum has a different origin than that of microwaves from 1 to 15 GHz, although it is not possible to draw a definitive conclusion about its emitting mechanism. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 13/24155-3 - Solar flare diagnostic in an unprecedented frequency range from microwaves to THz frequencies: challenges for interpretation (flat)
Grantee:Carlos Guillermo Giménez de Castro
Support type: Research Projects - Thematic Grants