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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

Landscape correlates of bushmeat consumption and hunting in a post-frontier Amazonian region

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Author(s):
Torres, Patricia Carignano [1] ; Morsello, Carla [2] ; Parry, Luke [3, 4] ; Barlow, Jos [3, 5] ; Ferreira, Joice [6] ; Gardner, Toby [7, 8] ; Pardini, Renata [9]
Total Authors: 7
Affiliation:
[1] Univ Sao Paulo, Inst Biociencias, Dept Ecol, Rua Matao 101, Travessa 14, Cidade Univ, BR-05508090 Sao Paulo, SP - Brazil
[2] Univ Sao Paulo, Escola Artes Ciencias & Humanidades, Av Arlindo Bettio 1000, BR-03828000 Sao Paulo, SP - Brazil
[3] Univ Lancaster, Lancaster Environm Ctr, Lancaster LA1 4YQ - England
[4] Univ Fed Para, NAEA, Av Perimetral 1, BR-66075750 Belem, Para - Brazil
[5] Museu Paraense Emilio Goeldi, Av Magalhaes Barata 376, BR-66040170 Belem, Para - Brazil
[6] Embrapa Amazonia Oriental, Trav Dr Eneas Pinheiro S-N, CP 48, BR-66095100 Belem, Para - Brazil
[7] Univ Cambridge, Dept Zool, Downing St, Cambridge CB2 3EJ - England
[8] Stockholm Environm Inst, Linnegatan 87D, Box 24218, S-10451 Stockholm - Sweden
[9] Univ Sao Paulo, Inst Biociencias, Dept Zool, Rua Matao 101, Travessa 14, Cidade Univ, BR-05508090 Sao Paulo, SP - Brazil
Total Affiliations: 9
Document type: Journal article
Source: ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION; v. 45, n. 4, p. 315-323, DEC 2018.
Web of Science Citations: 1
Abstract

Identifying the drivers of bushmeat consumption and hunting is important for informing conservation strategies and recognizing challenges to human food security. However, studies often neglect the importance of landscape context, which can influence bushmeat supply and demand. Here, by quantifying bushmeat consumption and hunting in 262 households in a post-frontier region in Amazonia, we tested the hypotheses that bushmeat consumption and hunting are positively associated with two landscape characteristics: (1) forest cover, which has been shown to define game availability; and (2) remoteness, which is related to limited access to marketed meat. Bushmeat consumption was widespread but more likely in remote forested areas. Hunting was more likely in more forested areas, especially nearer to urban centres. Our findings suggest that bushmeat remains an important food source even in heavily altered forest regions and that landscape context is an important determinant of bushmeat consumption and hunting. Although people living in remote, forested areas are likely to be the most dependent on bushmeat, those living in more populous, peri-urban areas are likely the actors contributing most to total hunting effort, due to a higher probability of hunting combined with higher human population densities. This finding undermines the assumption that rural-urban migration in the tropics will deliver a much-needed reprieve for many overhunted species. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 11/19108-0 - Determinants of hunting and wild meat consumption in an agricultural frontier of Eastern Amazon
Grantee:Renata Pardini
Support type: Regular Research Grants
FAPESP's process: 11/19606-0 - Determinants of hunting and wild meat consumption in an agricultural frontier of Eastern Amazon
Grantee:Patricia Carignano Torres
Support type: Scholarships in Brazil - Doctorate