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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

KELT-22Ab: A Massive, Short-Period Hot Jupiter Transiting a Near-solar Twin

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Author(s):
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Labadie-Bartz, Jonathan [1, 2, 3] ; Rodriguez, Joseph E. [4] ; Stassun, Keivan G. [5, 6] ; Ciardi, David R. [7] ; Penev, Kaloyan [8] ; Johnson, Marshall C. [9] ; Gaudi, B. Scott [9] ; Colon, Knicole D. [10] ; Bieryla, Allyson [4] ; Latham, David W. [4] ; Pepper, Joshua [3] ; Collins, Karen A. [4] ; Evans, Phil [11] ; Relles, Howard [4] ; Siverd, Robert J. [12] ; Bento, Joao [13] ; Yao, Xinyu [3] ; Stockdale, Chris [14] ; Tan, Thiam-Guan [15] ; Zhou, George [4, 13] ; Eastman, Jason D. [4] ; Albrow, Michael D. [16] ; Bayliss, Daniel [17, 13] ; Beatty, Thomas G. [18, 19] ; Berlind, Perry [4] ; Bozza, Valerio [20, 21] ; Calkins, Michael L. [4] ; Cohen, David H. [22] ; Curtis, Ivan A. [23] ; Esquerdo, Gilbert A. [4] ; Feliz, Dax [5, 6] ; Fulton, Benjamin J. [24] ; Gregorio, Joao [25, 26] ; James, David [27] ; Jensen, Eric L. N. [22] ; Johnson, John A. [4] ; Johnson, Samson A. [9] ; Joner, Michael D. [28] ; Kasper, David [29] ; Kielkopf, John F. [30] ; Kuhn, Rudolf B. [31, 32] ; Lund, Michael B. [5] ; Malpas, Amber [16] ; Manner, Mark [33] ; McCrady, Nate [34] ; McLeod, Kim K. [35] ; Oberst, Thomas E. [36] ; Penny, Matthew T. [9] ; Reed, Phillip A. [37] ; Sliski, David H. [38] ; Stephens, Denise C. [28] ; Stevens, Daniel J. [9] ; Villanueva, Steven [9] ; Wittenmyer, Robert A. [39] ; Wright, J. T. [18, 19] ; Zambelli, Roberto [40]
Total Authors: 56
Affiliation:
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[1] Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Newark, DE 19716 - USA
[2] Univ Sao Paulo, Inst Astron Geofis & Ciencias Atmosfer, Rua Matao 1226, Cidade Univ, BR-05508900 Sao Paulo, SP - Brazil
[3] Lehigh Univ, Dept Phys, 16 Mem Dr East, Bethlehem, PA 18015 - USA
[4] Harvard Smithsonian Ctr Astrophys, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 - USA
[5] Vanderbilt Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Nashville, TN 37235 - USA
[6] Fisk Univ, Dept Phys, 1000 17th Ave North, Nashville, TN 37208 - USA
[7] CALTECH, IPAC, NExScI, Pasadena, CA 91125 - USA
[8] Univ Texas Dallas, Dept Phys, 800 West Campbell Rd, Richardson, TX 75080 - USA
[9] Ohio State Univ, Dept Astron, 140 West 18th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 - USA
[10] NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Exoplanets & Stellar Astrophys Lab Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 - USA
[11] El Sauce Observ, Rio Hurtado - Chile
[12] Las Cumbres Observ, 6740 Cortona Dr, Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 - USA
[13] Australian Natl Univ, Mt Stromlo Observ, Res Sch Astron & Astrophys, Cotter Rd, Weston, ACT 2611 - Australia
[14] Hazelwood Observ, Churchill, Vic - Australia
[15] Perth Exoplanet Survey Telescope, Perth, WA - Australia
[16] Univ Canterbury, Dept Phys & Astron, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch - New Zealand
[17] Univ Warwick, Dept Phys, Gibbet Hill Rd, Coventry CV4 7AL, W Midlands - England
[18] Penn State Univ, Dept Astron & Astrophys, 525 Davey Lab, University Pk, PA 16802 - USA
[19] Penn State Univ, Ctr Exoplanets & Habitable Worlds, 525 Davey Lab, University Pk, PA 16802 - USA
[20] Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Naples - Italy
[21] Univ Salerno, Dipartimento Fis ER Caianiello, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, I-84084 Fisciano - Italy
[22] Swarthmore Coll, Dept Phys & Astron, Swarthmore, PA 19081 - USA
[23] Ivan Curtis Private Observ, Adelaide, SA - Australia
[24] CALTECH, Div Geol & Planetary Sci, Pasadena, CA 91101 - USA
[25] Atalaia Grp, Portalegre - Portugal
[26] CROW Observ, Portalegre - Portugal
[27] Harvard Smithsonian Ctr Astrophys, Event Horizon Telescope, MS-42, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 - USA
[28] Brigham Young Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Provo, UT 84602 - USA
[29] Univ Wyoming, Dept Phys & Astron, Dept 3905, 1000 E Univ Ave, Laramie, WY 82071 - USA
[30] Univ Louisville, Dept Phys & Astron, Louisville, KY 40292 - USA
[31] South African Astron Observ, POB 9, Cape Town - South Africa
[32] Southern African Large Telescope, POB 9, ZA-7935 Cape Town - South Africa
[33] Spot Observ, Nashville, TN 37206 - USA
[34] Univ Montana, Dept Phys & Astron, Missoula, MT 59812 - USA
[35] Wellesley Coll, Dept Astron, Wellesley, MA 02481 - USA
[36] Westminster Coll, Dept Phys, New Wilmington, PA 16172 - USA
[37] Kutztown State Univ, Dept Phys Sci, Kutztown, PA 19530 - USA
[38] Univ Penn, Dept Phys & Astron, Philadelphia, PA 19104 - USA
[39] Univ Southern Queensland, Ctr Astrophys, Toowoomba, Qld 4350 - Australia
[40] Soc Astron Lunae, La Spezia - Italy
Total Affiliations: 40
Document type: Journal article
Source: ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL SUPPLEMENT SERIES; v. 240, n. 1 JAN 2019.
Web of Science Citations: 3
Abstract

We present the discovery of KELT-22Ab, a hot Jupiter from the KELT-South survey. KELT-22Ab transits the moderately bright (V similar to 11.1) Sun-like G2V star TYC 7518-468-1. The planet has an orbital period of P = 1.3866529 +/- 0.0000027 days, a radius of R-P = 1.285(-0.071)(+0.12) R-J, and a relatively large mass of M-P = 3.47(-0.14)(+0.15), M-J. The star has R-star = 1.099(-0.046)(0.079) R-circle dot, M-star = 1.092(-0.041)(+0.045) M-circle dot, T-eff = 5767(-49)(+50) K, log g(star) = 4.393(-0.060)(+0.039) (cgs), and {[}m/H] = +0.259(-0.083)(+0.085); thus other than its slightly super-solar metallicity, it appears to be a near-solar twin. Surprisingly, KELT-22A exhibits kinematics and a Galactic orbit that are somewhat atypical for thin-disk stars. Nevertheless, the star is rotating rapidly for its estimated age, and shows evidence of chromospheric activity. Imaging reveals a slightly fainter companion to KELT-22A that is likely bound, with a projected separation of 6 `' (similar to 1400 au). In addition to the orbital motion caused by the transiting planet, we detect a possible linear trend in the radial velocity of KELT-22A, suggesting the presence of another relatively nearby body that is perhaps non-stellar. KELT-22Ab is highly irradiated (as a consequence of the small semimajor axis of a/R-star, and is mildly inflated. At such small separations, tidal forces become significant. The configuration of this system is optimal for measuring the rate of tidal dissipation within the host star. Our models predict that, due to tidal forces, the semimajor axis is decreasing rapidly, and KELT-22Ab is predicted to spiral into the star within the next Gyr. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 17/23731-1 - Analysis and Modeling of a Large Sample of Galactic Be Stars
Grantee:Jonathan Michael Labadie-Bartz
Support type: Scholarships in Brazil - Post-Doctorate