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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

What are the clinical implications of knee crepitus to individuals with knee osteoarthritis? An observational study with data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

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Author(s):
Pazzinatto, Marcella Ferraz [1, 2] ; Silva, Danilo de Oliveira [1, 2] ; Faria, Nathalie Clara [2] ; Simic, Milena [3] ; Ferreira, Paulo Henrique [3] ; de Azevedo, Fabio Micolis [2] ; Pappas, Evangelos [3]
Total Authors: 7
Affiliation:
[1] La Trobe Univ, La Trobe Sports & Exercise Med Res Ctr LASEM, Sch Allied Hlth, Bundoora, Vic - Australia
[2] Univ Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho UN, Sch Sci & Technol, Phys Therapy Dept, Presidente Prudente, SP - Brazil
[3] Univ Sydney, Fac Hlth Sci, Discipline Physiotherapy, Sydney, NSW - Australia
Total Affiliations: 3
Document type: Journal article
Source: BRAZILIAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL THERAPY; v. 23, n. 6, p. 491-496, NOV-DEC 2019.
Web of Science Citations: 0
Abstract

Background: Crepitus is a common clinical feature of knee osteoarthritis. However, the importance of crepitus in the overall clinical presentation of individuals with knee osteoarthritis is unknown. Objective(s): (A) To compare function, pain and quality of life between individuals with knee osteoarthritis with and without crepitus; (B) to compare whether individuals with knee osteoarthritis in both knees, but crepitus in just one, differ in terms of function pain, and knee strength. Methods:: Setting: Observational study. Participants: (A) A total of 584 participants with crepitus who had the same Kellgren-Lawrence grade on both knees were matched for gender, body mass index and Kellgren-Lawrence grade to participants without crepitus on both knees. (B) 361 participants with crepitus in only one knee and with the same Kellgren-Lawrence grade classification on both knees were included. Main outcome measure(s): A - Self-reported function, pain, quality of life, 20-m walk test and chair-stand test. B - Knee extensor and flexor strength, self-reported function and pain. Results: A - Individuals with crepitus had lower self-reported function, quality of life and higher pain compared to those without crepitus (3-11%; small effect = 0.17-0.41, respectively). No difference was found in objective function between groups. B - Self-reported function was lower in the limb with crepitus compared to the limb without crepitus (15%; trivial effect = 0.09). No difference was found in pain and knee strength between-groups. Conclusion(s): Individuals with knee osteoarthritis and knee crepitus have slightly lower self-reported physical function and knee-related quality of life (small or trivial effect). However, the presence of knee crepitus is not associated with objective function or knee strength. (C) 2018 Associacao Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pos-Graduacao em Fisioterapia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 15/11534-1 - INFLUENCE OF PAIN IN THE ANALYSIS OF PROXIMAL, LOCAL AND DISTAL KINEMATIC PARAMETERS IN FEMALES WITH PATELLOFEMORAL PAIN DURING STAIR ASCENT AND DESCENT
Grantee:Danilo de Oliveira Silva
Support type: Scholarships in Brazil - Doctorate
FAPESP's process: 15/10631-3 - Does it matter that my knee clicks? a longitudinal study of functional decline based on the presence of CREPITUS: data from the osteoarthritis initiative
Grantee:Marcella Ferraz Pazzinatto
Support type: Scholarships abroad - Research Internship - Master's degree