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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

Chemical composition, bioactive compounds extraction, and observed biological activities from jussara (Euterpe edulis): The exotic and endangered Brazilian superfruit

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Author(s):
Vannuchi, Nicholas [1] ; Jamar, Giovana [1] ; Pisani, Luciana [1] ; Braga, Anna Rafaela Cavalcante [1, 2] ; de Rosso, Veridiana Vera [1, 3]
Total Authors: 5
Affiliation:
[1] Univ Fed Sao Paulo UNIFESP, Dept Biosci, Rua Silva Jardim 136, Santos, SP - Brazil
[2] Univ Fed Sao Paulo UNIFESP, Dept Chem Engn, Rua Sao Nicolau 210, Diadema, SP - Brazil
[3] Univ Fed Sao Paulo UNIFESP, Nutr & Food Serv Res Ctr, Rua Silva Jardim 136, BR-11015020 Santos, SP - Brazil
Total Affiliations: 3
Document type: Review article
Source: COMPREHENSIVE REVIEWS IN FOOD SCIENCE AND FOOD SAFETY; v. 20, n. 4, p. 3192-3224, JUL 2021.
Web of Science Citations: 0
Abstract

In this article, we reviewed studies on the fruits of the jussara palm (Euterpe edulis Martius), an endangered Brazilian Atlantic Forest palm tree, also coined as ``Superfruit.{''} We summarized the chemical components of the pulp and observed biological activities in murine and humans, as well as the best practices involving the extraction of its target compounds, bioavailability, and stability of extracts. Jussara has shown a rich phenolic profile that justifies its antioxidant properties, in addition to a considerable lipidic and energetic value. As the main feature, the fruit possesses large amounts of anthocyanins that can be commercially explored as a food additive or cosmetic colorants. Recent studies emphasized jussara's antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and cardioprotective capabilities via reshaping of the gut microbiota. Further knowledge is needed to establish bioavailability and optimal serving size, as many of its antioxidant compounds go under chemical bioconversion in the intestinal tract. While extraction of phenolic compounds, anthocyanins, and oils have interesting results, more studies are required in order to reduce the use of conventional organic solvents and improve their stability and shelf life when added to food products, an area in which nanotechnology seems promising. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 18/04265-2 - Anthocyanin extraction from Juçara (Euterpe edulis Mart.) using deep eutectic solvents, nanotechnological application and for 3D food printing
Grantee:Nicholas Tadeu Vannuchi da Costa Almeida
Support type: Scholarships in Brazil - Doctorate