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Fiber optic bragg grating: fabrication, characterization, and applications for optical fiber sensors and communications

Grant number: 99/07519-2
Support type:Regular Research Grants
Duration: October 01, 1999 - September 30, 2001
Field of knowledge:Engineering - Electrical Engineering - Telecommunications
Principal Investigator:Haroldo Takashi Hattori
Grantee:Haroldo Takashi Hattori
Home Institution: Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica (ITA). Ministério da Defesa (Brasil). São José dos Campos , SP, Brazil

Abstract

Research in optical fiber gratings (OFG's) at ITA/IEAv aims to develop the technology of manufacturing, characterization and applications of these devices in the areas of sensing and Communications. In recent years, OFG's have played a major role in opto-electronic systems dedicated to Communications and instrumentation. Stress and temperature sensors, based on these devices, are compact, very sensitive, immune to EMI (Electro-Magnetic Interference), etc. On the other hand, pulse compressors, multiplexers (WDM - Wavelength Division Multiplexers), filters (FWDM - Filter Wavelength Division Multiplexers and BWDM - Bandpass Wavelength Division Multiplexers), optical switches (ADOM - Add/Drop Optical Module) and lasers are good examples of applications in Communications. The proposed project will provide an understanding of several important phenomena in fundamental physics and applied engineering, including those related to modem systems in Communications and instrumentation. At the same time, the technology of sensors based upon OFG's have played their role in distributed stress and temperature measurement, with several applications in civil engineering such as construction of buildings, houses, tunnels, mines, etc; and in mechanical and materials engineering such as construction of structures, devices, aeronautical and terrestrial vehicles, etc. OFG's are natural candidates to applications in a fast-tracking area called Smart Structures, which tries to develop novel materials and structures capable of real-time self-adaptive behavior under external interference. In these applications, OFG's can be considered as the nerves of glass of these novel materials and structures. The background of the groups involved in this project is quite appropriate to the development of this new technology and the consolidation of this project will bring us to a leading position in this new research area. (AU)