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Differential expression of genes associated with angular leaf spot resistance in common bean

Grant number: 13/12560-0
Support type:Scholarships in Brazil - Scientific Initiation
Effective date (Start): August 01, 2013
Effective date (End): July 31, 2014
Field of knowledge:Agronomical Sciences - Agronomy
Principal Investigator:Luciana Lasry Benchimol-Reis
Grantee:Caléo Panhoca de Almeida
Home Institution: Instituto Agronômico (IAC). Agência Paulista de Tecnologia dos Agronegócios (APTA). Secretaria de Agricultura e Abastecimento (São Paulo - Estado). Campinas , SP, Brazil

Abstract

The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most widely consumed legume in the world. Its yield can be affected by many factors such as diseases. Angular leaf spot, caused by the fungus Pseudocercospora griseola (Sacc.) Crous & U. Braun, causes losses of up to 80% in bean production. The bean breeding search tools that streamline the transfer of resistance genes to developing cultivars. Genomic tools allow us to mark, clone and introgress genes and/or QTLs (Quantitative Trait Loci) using molecular markers. The use of specific markers for genes involved in resistance helps to obtain cultivars resistant to diseases. Thus, the IAC Bean Breeding Program has invested in identifying genes for resistance to various bean diseases. Work from our group has identified seven QTLs for resistance to ALS through mapping the UC population (IAC-UNA x CAL 143), revealing the pattern of inheritance of quantitative resistance in CAL-143. Among these QTLs, the ALS10.1, mapped on linkage group 10, showed larger effect on the phenotype and it has been studied in greater detail. The saturation of this region of the bean genome has allowed the identification of putative genes involved in the immune response against P. griseola. Therefore, to continue this work (process aid FAPESP 2010/51673-7; Doctoral scholarship FAPESP 2009/02411-2) and with the goal of increasing the understanding of plant-pathogen interaction mechanisms in the ALS bean response, this project will evaluate the expression of 14 putative genes of beans present in ALS10.1 in response to infection by the P. griseola pathogen. The results of this study should provide information of the possible pathways involved in the interaction of P. vulgaris - P. griseola with the identification of new candidate genes for resistance to angular leaf spot, which may be used to obtain more resistant bean varieties. The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most widely consumed legume in the world. Your productivity can be affected by many factors, and the occurrence of a major illness. Angular leaf spot, caused by the fungus Pseudocercospora griseola (Sacc.) Crous & U. Braun, causes losses of up to 80% in bean production. The bean breeding search tools that streamline the transfer of resistance genes to diseases in developing cultivars. Genomic tools allow you to mark, clone and introgress genes or QTLs (Quantitative Trait Loci) using molecular markers. The use of specific markers for genes involved in resistance helps to obtain cultivars resistant to diseases. Thus, the Bean Improvement Program IAC (PMF - IAC) has invested in identifying genes for resistance to various diseases afentam beans, including blight. Work from our group has identified seven QTLs for resistance to this disease through the population UC (IAC-UNA x 143 CAL), revealing the pattern of inheritance of quantitative resistance in strain 143 CAL. Among these QTLs the ALS10.1, mapped on linkage group 10 showed greater effect on strength and it has been studied in greater detail. The saturation this region of the genome has allowed the identification of putative genes involved in the immune response against P. griseola. So, to continue this work (process aid FAPESP 2010/51673-7; Doctoral scholarship FAPESP 2009/02411-2) and the intention of increasing the understanding of mechanisms of plant-pathogen interaction in the response of beans to ALS, this project will evaluate the expression of 14 putative genes of beans present in loco ALS10.1 in response to infection by the pathogen P. griseola. The results of this study should provide information on the possible pathways involved in the interaction P. vulgaris - P. griseola with the identification of candidate genes for resistance to angular leaf spot, which can be used to obtain more resistant bean variety. The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most widely consumed legume in th (AU)