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Functional investigation of ANAPC13 gene in progression of ductal carcinoma of the breast

Grant number: 13/08886-8
Support type:Scholarships in Brazil - Master
Effective date (Start): September 01, 2013
Effective date (End): July 31, 2015
Field of knowledge:Health Sciences - Medicine
Principal Investigator:Dirce Maria Carraro
Grantee:Daiana Karol Koshimae Marin
Home Institution: A C Camargo Cancer Center. Fundação Antonio Prudente (FAP). São Paulo , SP, Brazil

Abstract

The ductal carcinoma of the breast corresponds to the significant majority of tumors that affect the female breast. The ductal breast carcinoma in situ (DCIS) may progress to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), therefore some of the DCIS cells can coexist with invasive malignant cells, thus these cells are named as component in situ of invasive carcinoma (DCIS-IDC). Our group identified previously that molecular changes necessary for tumor cell to acquire the ability to invade adjacent tissue occur before to morphological changes, and the difference of expression between tumor cells from these two different subtypes of pre-invasive lesions (DCIS pure and compartment in situ of DCIS-IDC) can help to identify genes involved in early stages of progression of pure DCIS. Among the genes that showed alterations in cells from in situ component of two types of pre-invasive lesions with different malignant potential (DCIS pure and DCIS-IDC), the ANAPC13 gene showed decreased levels of expression in different tumor cell groups represented by tumor cells of DCIS, in situ component of DCIS-IDC and IDC. This decrease of expression was confirmed by protein level, assessing the same components in independent groups of samples, suggesting that decreased of ANAPC13 is involved with the progression of DCIS. Thus, the aim of this project is to perform functional studies of tumorigenic process in function of ANAPC13, because this gene has potential to be a predictive biomarker of progression of pure DCIS and require more detailed studies