Advanced search
Start date
Betweenand

Therapeutic potential of drugs entrapped into phosphatidylserine-liposomes: an experimental approach

Grant number: 14/10843-8
Support type:Scholarships abroad - Research Internship - Doctorate
Effective date (Start): September 01, 2014
Effective date (End): February 28, 2015
Field of knowledge:Biological Sciences - Parasitology
Principal Investigator:André Gustavo Tempone Cardoso
Grantee:Érika Gracielle Pinto
Supervisor abroad: Kevin David Read
Home Institution: Instituto Adolfo Lutz (IAL). Coordenadoria de Controle de Doenças (CCD). Secretaria da Saúde (São Paulo - Estado). São Paulo , SP, Brazil
Local de pesquisa : University of Dundee, Scotland  
Associated to the scholarship:11/23703-1 - Study of the therapeutic potential of drugs and synthetic compounds, free or loaded into NANOLIPOSOMES: an vitro and experimental approach, BP.DR

Abstract

Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease, which includes a diseases spectrum of varying degrees of severity, resulting from a skin lesion to a progressive fatal visceral infection. Estimated at 12 million cases, leishmaniasis affects 98 countries with a limited and toxic therapeutic arsenal. The development of new therapies for leishmaniasis is therefore essential. Liposomes have been widely used as safe and effective drug delivery system, and a successful example is the liposomal amphotericin B, which has been widely used to treat leishmaniasis with fewer toxic effects. This project aims to develop a new nanoliposomal formulation containing phosphatidylserine (PS-LP) to entrap an antileishmanial compound developed by the Drug Discovery Unit - University of Dundee. The in vivo pharmacokinetics will be performed for free and PS-LP formulated compound in mice using UPLC/MS/MS. The compound efficacy will then be assessed as a free and liposomal formulation using different doses and regimens of administration in an L. donovani mouse model of visceral leishmaniasis. The evaluation of drug efficacy will be determined microscopically on Giemsa-stained liver smears. Targeting drugs through phosphatidylserine-liposomes may improve the therapeutic index of antileishmanial compounds and result in future alternative treatments for visceral leishmaniasis. (AU)