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Turn hostility into festivity Murui-Muinai dances from a visual approach

Grant number: 19/27034-9
Support type:Scholarships abroad - Research Internship - Post-doctor
Effective date (Start): March 01, 2020
Effective date (End): August 31, 2020
Field of knowledge:Humanities - Anthropology - Rural Anthropology
Principal Investigator:Nashieli Cecilia Rangel Loera
Grantee:Marco Alejandro Tobón Ocampo
Supervisor abroad: Oscar Hernando Guarin Martinez
Home Institution: Instituto de Filosofia e Ciências Humanas (IFCH). Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP). Campinas , SP, Brazil
Local de pesquisa : Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia  
Associated to the scholarship:18/08937-5 - The ritual dances and the healing of war the Indigenous Amazon in post-peace agreements in Colômbia, BP.PD

Abstract

This project proposes a 4-month research internship (March / 2020 - June / 2019) at SensoLab (Laboratory of Experimentation in Image and Sound) of the Faculty of Social Sciences of the Pontifical Javeriana University of Bogota - Colombia. In this period, I will develop, under the supervision of prof. Oscar Guarín, research activities with the collected ethnographic material, especially images and audiovisual recordings, related to my postdoctoral research into the powers of the Murui-Muinai ritual dances to transform the threatening forces of war, animality, and mutual care. , the danger in protection, the hostility in the festivity. As a result of the first phase of the fieldwork project The Ritual Dances and the healing of war. Indigenous Amazon in the post-peace accords in Colombia, FAPESP process no. 2018 / 08937-5, it was understood the importance of exposing, through visual language, the processes by which the Murui-Muinai transform the risks of violence in defense of life. The work together with prof. Oscar Guarín, who has been researching visual narratives about the historical construction of images about the Amazon, will allow us to deepen the analysis of how Amazonian ritual dances act as politics, that is, they deal with public questions about powers and death, about the possibilities of reconciliation. And the transformation of fierce bodies into dancing, celebrating bodies. Thus, in addition to contributing to the studies of ritual dances in Amazonian peoples, we intend to elaborate an artifact of visual communication (video or sequence of photos), which can participate in the public dialogue about the collective ways of overcoming violence and the common paths of historical and political transition.