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Standardization of purification and identification of microvesicles of HIV+ pacients plasma

Grant number: 19/25348-6
Support type:Scholarships in Brazil - Scientific Initiation
Effective date (Start): July 01, 2020
Effective date (End): June 30, 2021
Field of knowledge:Biological Sciences - Immunology - Applied Immunology
Principal Investigator:Fabiani Gai Frantz
Grantee:Felipe Celloni Blaya Martinez
Home Institution: Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto (FCFRP). Universidade de São Paulo (USP). Ribeirão Preto , SP, Brazil
Associated research grant:18/15066-0 - Epigenetic programming during chronic infectious diseases: tiring out and training the innate immune system, AP.JP2

Abstract

The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), which causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), is considered a major public health problem worldwide. In Brazil, it is estimated that 867,000 people are living with HIV, and in 2017, 48,000 new cases were reported and 14,000 died as a result of the infection. The drugs available for therapy are effective in reducing circulating viral load and the consequent development of immunodeficiency syndrome, but patients on antiretroviral treatment have early non-infectious comorbidities such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, renal failure, neurodegeneration and cancer. These findings have been mainly associated with chronic systemic inflammation and the immunosenescence process triggered by infection and persistence of viral reservoirs. Extracellular vesicles produced and released by senescent cells play an important role in intercellular communication and consequently may favor the senescence process in adjacent cells. For that, the vesicles would be able to carry membrane components, cytoplasmic and nuclear content and also serve as vectors for the transfer of proteins, lipids, messenger RNA and microRNA. Our hypothesis is that microvesicles could regulate the immune response and early senescence induction of these cells following HIV infection in chronically infected patients. Thus, this project aims to standardize the extraction and characterization of circulating microvesicles from the plasma of patients living with HIV. This knowledge will assist in the development of other laboratory projects aimed at identifying biomarkers or potential molecular targets for therapy or disease prognosis. (AU)