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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

The niche and phylogeography of a passerine reveal the history of biological diversification between the Andean and the Atlantic forests

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Author(s):
Trujillo-Arias, Natalia ; Dantas, Gisele P. M. ; Arbelaez-Cortes, Enrique ; Naoki, Kazuya ; Gomez, Maria I. ; Santos, Fabricio R. ; Miyaki, Cristina Y. ; Aleixo, Alexandre ; Tubaro, Pablo L. ; Cabanne, Gustavo S.
Total Authors: 10
Document type: Journal article
Source: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution; v. 112, p. 107-121, JUL 2017.
Web of Science Citations: 11
Abstract

The Atlantic Forest is separated from the Andean tropical forest by dry and open vegetation biomes (Chaco and Cerrado). Despite this isolation, both rainforests share closely related lineages, which suggest a past connection. This connection could have been important for forest taxa evolution. In this study, we used the Saffron-billed Sparrow (Arremonflavirostris) as a model to evaluate whether the Andean and the Atlantic forests act as a refugia system, as well as to test for a history of biogeographic connection between them. In addition, we evaluated the molecular systematic of intraspecific lineages of the studied species. We modeled the current and past distribution of A. flavirostris, performed phylogeographic analyses based on mitochondrial and nuclear genes, and used Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) analyses to test for biogeographic scenarios. The major phylogeographic disjunction within A. flavirostris was found between the Andean and the Atlantic forests, with a divergence that occurred during the Mid Pleistocene. Our paleodistribution models indicated a connection between these forest domains in different periods and through both the Chaco and Cerrado. Additionally, the phylogeographic and ABC analyses supported that the Cerrado was the main route of connection between these rainforests, but without giving decisive evidence against a Chaco connection. Our study with A. flavirostris suggest that the biodiversity of the Andean and of the Atlantic forests could have been impacted (and perhaps enriched?) by cycles of connections through the Cerrado and Chaco. This recurrent cycle of connection between the Andean and the Atlantic Forest could have been important for the evolution of Neotropical forest taxa. In addition, we discussed taxonomic implications of the results and proposed to split the studied taxon into two full species. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 13/50297-0 - Dimensions US-BIOTA São Paulo: a multidisciplinary framework for biodiversity prediction in the Brazilian Atlantic forest hotspot
Grantee:Cristina Yumi Miyaki
Support type: BIOTA-FAPESP Program - Thematic Grants