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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

Nitrogen input by bamboos in neotropical forest: a new perspective

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Author(s):
Padgurschi, Maira C. G. [1] ; Vieira, Simone A. [2] ; Stefani, Edson J. F. [1] ; Nardoto, Gabriela B. [3] ; Joly, Carlos A. [1]
Total Authors: 5
Affiliation:
[1] Univ Estadual Campinas, Plant Biol Dept, Campinas, SP - Brazil
[2] Univ Estadual Campinas, Ctr Environm Studies & Res, Campinas, SP - Brazil
[3] Univ Brasilia, Dept Ecol, Brasilia, DF - Brazil
Total Affiliations: 3
Document type: Journal article
Source: PeerJ; v. 6, NOV 29 2018.
Web of Science Citations: 0
Abstract

Background. Nitrogen (N) is an important macronutrient that controls the productivity of ecosystems and biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a major source of N in terrestrial systems, particularly tropical forests. Bamboo dominates theses forests, but our knowledge regarding the role of bamboo in ecosystem functioning remains in its infancy. We investigated the importance of a native bamboo species to the N cycle of a Neotropical forest. Methods. We selected 100 sample units (100 m(2) each) in a pristine montane Atlantic Forest, in Brazil. We counted all the clumps and live culms of Merostachys neesii bamboo and calculated the specific and total leaf area, as well as litter production and respective N content. Potential N input was estimated based on available data on BNF rates for the same bamboo species, whose N input was then contextualized using information on N cycling components in the study area. Results. With 4,000 live culms ha(-1), the native bamboo may contribute up to 11.7 kg N ha(-1) during summer (January to March) and 19.6 kg N ha(-1) in winter (July to September). When extrapolated for annual values, M. neesii could contribute more than 60 kg N ha(-1)y(-1). Discussion. The bamboo species' contribution to N input may be due to its abundance (habitat availability for microbial colonization) and the composition of the free-living N fixer community on its leaves (demonstrated in previous studies). Although some N is lost during decomposition, this input could mitigate the N deficit in the Atlantic Forest studied by at least 27%. Our findings suggest that M. neesii closely regulates N input and may better explain the high diversity and carbon stocks in the area. This is the first time that a study has investigated BNF using free-living N fixers on the phyllosphere of bamboo. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 03/12595-7 - Floristic composition, structure and functioning of the Dense Rainforest nuclei of Picinguaba and Santa Virgínia of Parque Estadual da Serra do Mar, State of São Paulo, Brazil
Grantee:Carlos Alfredo Joly
Support type: BIOTA-FAPESP Program - Thematic Grants
FAPESP's process: 12/51872-5 - ECOFOR: Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in degraded and recovering Amazonian and Atlantic Forests
Grantee:Carlos Alfredo Joly
Support type: BIOTA-FAPESP Program - Thematic Grants
FAPESP's process: 07/57465-4 - The carbon balance over an area of Atlantic Rainforest with micrometeorological and biometrical measurements
Grantee:Humberto Ribeiro da Rocha
Support type: Regular Research Grants
FAPESP's process: 08/50285-3 - Controls of the Atlantic Rainforest on the local and regional climate
Grantee:Carlos Afonso Nobre
Support type: Regular Research Grants
FAPESP's process: 15/50682-6 - Climate-smart watershed investments in the montane tropics of South America (ClimateWise)
Grantee:Humberto Ribeiro da Rocha
Support type: Research Program on Global Climate Change - Thematic Grants
FAPESP's process: 12/50343-9 - A geosensor network to adress hydroclimatic environmental services
Grantee:Humberto Ribeiro da Rocha
Support type: Research Program on Global Climate Change - Regular Grants