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Optimising the long term management of invasive species affecting biodiversity and the rural economy using adaptive management

Grant number: 18/14995-8
Support type:Regular Research Grants
Duration: February 01, 2019 - January 31, 2022
Field of knowledge:Biological Sciences - Ecology - Applied Ecology
Cooperation agreement: Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (CONICYT) ; CONICET ; NERC, UKRI ; Newton Fund - LATAM ; Newton Fund, with FAPESP as a partner institution in Brazil
Principal Investigator:Alessandra Tomaselli Fidelis
Grantee:Alessandra Tomaselli Fidelis
Principal investigator abroad: Martin Nuñez
Institution abroad: Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Argentina
Principal investigator abroad: Lia Fernanda Montti
Institution abroad: Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Argentina
Principal investigator abroad: Ignacio Alejandro Rodriguez Jorquera
Institution abroad: Universidad Austral de Chile (UACh), Chile
Principal investigator abroad: Carlos Ignacio Roesler
Institution abroad: Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA), Argentina
Principal investigator abroad: Anibal Pauchard
Institution abroad: Universidad de Concepción (UdeC), Chile
Principal investigator abroad: Xavier Lambin
Institution abroad: University of Aberdeen, Scotland
Home Institution: Instituto de Biociências (IB). Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP). Campus de Rio Claro. Rio Claro , SP, Brazil
Assoc. researchers: Euan Cartner Phimister ; Gabriella de Faria Oliveira Damasceno Ribeiro ; Justin Mark John Travis ; Laura Fasola ; Thomas Cornulier ; Vânia Regina Pivello
Associated scholarship(s):19/14207-2 - Analysis of biological invasions in the Cerrado, BP.TT

Abstract

A large number of highly damaging invasive non-native species(INNS) have become established in South America. They affect native species, ecosystems and livelihoods.Many INNS are now so widespread that eradication is not an option. Their spread must be contained and their density reduced, in the long-term, in those areas where taking no action is not acceptable. This must be done as cost effectively as possible and consider: By how much should INNS density be reduced? How should the desired reduction be achieved? Where should the species be reduced?Some ecosystems and human activities can withstand low density INNS presence, while others are so vulnerable they cannot tolerate even low INNS density. The cost of managing INNS also varies spatially especially in South America, where some areas are very difficult to access and workforce is sparse. A further important consideration is that INNS are mobile.This is both a challenge and an opportunity if management can exploit known patterns of spread.Ecologists have been studying dispersal dynamics in detail for decades, but have rarely used this knowledge to design effective management interventions. We will design and introduce to stakeholders a user-friendly decision tool that we expect will become widely used in Latin America.To make sure our approach is relevant for different contexts, we will work with example species that have large impacts, and for which data already exist. We will also model plausible scenarios for data-poor pine species, exotic grasses and carnivorous wasps, that impact local communities in Brazil, Argentina and Chile. We will find the most effective strategic management using sophisticated computer simulations considering species ecology, dispersal and intervention costs in a spatial context. We will identify where new data would most effectively reduce uncertainty on the best course of action.The problem we tackle is complex, and we will embed it in a process of co-operative adaptive management, so that managers continually improve their effectiveness by confronting different models to data. We will also use our project as a way to build research capacity in Latin America, by training early career researchers and PhD students by means of research visits, continuous collaboration and workshops. Our project will have a tangible positive and immediate impact on people and biodiversity in Latin America by delivering a step-change in the management of problematic INNS.Our project will have a tangible positive and immediate impact on people and biodiversity in Latin America by delivering a step-change in the management of problematic INNS. We will design and introduce to stakeholders a user-friendly decision tool that we expect will become widely used in Latin America. To make sure our approach is relevant for different contexts in Latin America, we will work with example species that have large impacts, and for which data already exist. We will also model plausible scenarios for data-poor pine species, exotic grasses and carnivorous wasps, that impact local communities in Brazil, Argentina and Chile. We will find the most effective strategic management using sophisticated computer simulations considering species ecology, dispersal and intervention costs in a spatial context.We will identify where new data would most effectively reduce uncertainty on the best course of action. The problem we tackle is complex and we will embed it in a process of co-operative adaptive management so that managers continually improve their effectiveness by confronting different models to data. We will also use our project as a way to build research capacity in Latin America, by training early career researchers and PhD students by means of research visits, continuous collaboration and workshops. Our project will have a tangible positive and immediate impact on people and biodiversity in Latin America by delivering a step-change in the management of problematic INNS. (AU)

Scientific publications
(References retrieved automatically from Web of Science and SciELO through information on FAPESP grants and their corresponding numbers as mentioned in the publications by the authors)
LAMBIN, XAVIER; BURSLEM, DAVID; CAPLAT, PAUL; CORNULIER, THOMAS; DAMASCENO, GABRIELLA; FASOLA, LAURA; FIDELIS, ALESSANDRA; GARCIA-DIAZ, PABLO; LANGDON, BARBARA; LINARDAKI, EIRINI; MONTTI, LIA; MOYANO, JAIME; NUNEZ, MARTIN A.; PALMER, STEPHEN C. F.; PAUCHARD, ANIBAL; PHIMISTER, EUAN; CRISTOBAL PIZARRO, JOSE; POWELL, PRISCILA; RAFFO, EDUARDO; RODRIGUEZ-JORQUERA, IGNACIO A.; ROESLER, IGNACIO; TOMASEVIC, JORGE A.; TRAVIS, JUSTIN M. J.; VERDUGO, CLAUDIO. CONTAIN: Optimising the long-term management of invasive alien species using adaptive management. NEOBIOTA, n. 59, p. 119-138, AUG 5 2020. Web of Science Citations: 0.

Please report errors in scientific publications list by writing to: cdi@fapesp.br.