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Multiplexing applications in the study of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases

Grant number: 09/53860-1
Support type:Multi-user Equipment Program
Duration: October 01, 2010 - September 30, 2012
Field of knowledge:Health Sciences - Medicine - Medical Clinics
Principal Investigator:Eloisa Silva Dutra de Oliveira Bonfá
Grantee:Eloisa Silva Dutra de Oliveira Bonfá
Home Institution: Faculdade de Medicina (FM). Universidade de São Paulo (USP). São Paulo , SP, Brazil
As informações de acesso ao Equipamento Multiusuário são de responsabilidade do Pesquisador responsável
EMU web page: Página do Equipamento Multiusuário não informada
Tipo de equipamento: Tipo de Equipamento Multiusuário não informado
Fabricante: Fabricante não informado
Modelo: Modelo não informado

Abstract

Plasma and tissue levels of cytokines constitute an important parameter for the study of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases pathophysiology. The importance of cytokines as mediators is demonstrated by the recent advances in biological therapies that target their reduction. The determination of cytokine levels is standard practice in the assessment of treatment efficacy. Currently, these determinations are made by ELISA, and large volume of biological material for the individual quantification of each mediator is the major limitation of this method. This is particularly relevant in studies that involve children, small animals, or debilitated patients. Multiplex is a new technology that significantly reduces assay time, costs and has the great advantage to require small volume for several tests performed simultaneously. The objective of this proposal is to implement cytokines determination using multiplex assay at the USP School of Medicine. The only device similar to the one requested in this project is calibrated for routine use in the Histocompatibility Laboratory and due to the high demand it is not available for research projects.The acquisition of a new multiplex device will be useful to test the effects of biological therapies in morethan 5,000 samples (- 70oC frozen material collected from approximately 300 rheumatology patients followed longitudinally: 2007-2009) of the Biological Center Unit. In addition, the device will be useful for the study of the effect of lipid nanoparticles combined with methotrexate in the treatment of antigeninduced arthritis in rabbits. Furthermore, the evaluation of cytokines will be relevant for determining the efficacy of vaccine therapy in HIV-infected patients. Other FAPESPsponsored projects in development at the USP School of Medicine, will also benefit from the use of this technology. It is therefore clear that the device will facilitate the technical work of many researchers who study autoimmune and inflammatory diseases in humans and animals, as well as reducing costs and the need for specialized support staff. (AU)