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Global change and residence time of carbon in vegetation and soils along an altitudinal gradient in Atlantic Forest in northeast of São Paulo State - Brazil

Grant number: 12/10851-5
Support type:BIOTA-FAPESP Program - Regular Research Grants
Duration: October 01, 2012 - November 30, 2014
Field of knowledge:Biological Sciences - Ecology
Principal Investigator:Simone Aparecida Vieira
Grantee:Simone Aparecida Vieira
Home Institution: Núcleo de Estudos e Pesquisas Ambientais (NEPAM). Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP). Campinas , SP, Brazil
Assoc. researchers:Carlos Alfredo Joly ; Flavio Antonio Maës dos Santos

Abstract

To predict the potential for tropical forest stocking or losing carbon, it is necessary to understand the variations in the structure and dynamics of trees. In general, tropical forests are seen as if them all had the same behavior and little is known on the variations in the structure and functioning of forests along an elevational gradient, where the principal remnants of Atlantic Forest in Brazil. In order to understanding the carbon dynamic in vegetation and soil in the Atlantic Forest in the State of São Paulo, particularly the potential of these pristine forests act as a carbon source or sink due to global climate and environmental change, we will investigate 18 1 ha permanent plots established by: project BIOTA / FAPESP "Functional gradient" (Proc. no. 03/12595-7 and 10/51897-2) and project Climate FAPESP (08/58159-7), along an elevational gradient since sea level (restinga forest) to forests that occur at 1000 m asl (Montana Tropical Rain Forest), on the northern coast of São Paulo. Previous studies show that the sites present differences in the forest structure, biomass, above and below ground carbon stocks, in the litterfall and tree growth rate and, consequently, at the tree age and in the amount of carbon that they accumulate annually. We will use advanced techniques (accelerator mass spectrometry) combined with a classical field ecology and dendrometry to integrate large-scale biogeochemical processes in the Atlantic Forest, to understand the vulnerability of these forests to human and climate influence. (AU)