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Peirce's and Deleuze's philosophies of continuity concerning the theory of relations and multiplicities

Grant number: 11/18375-5
Support type:Scholarships abroad - Research
Effective date (Start): April 30, 2012
Effective date (End): June 02, 2012
Field of knowledge:Humanities - Philosophy - Metaphysics
Principal researcher:Hélio Rebello Cardoso Júnior
Grantee:Hélio Rebello Cardoso Júnior
Host: Anne Sauvagnargues
Home Institution: Faculdade de Ciências e Letras (FCL-ASSIS). Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP). Campus de Assis. Assis , SP, Brazil
Research place: Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense (Paris 10), France  

Abstract

Gilles Deleuze, French Philosopher (1925-1995) calls in Charles Sanders Peirce, American philosopher (1839-1914), when the former assumed the development of a Semiotics for the cinema. Peirce has long become acknowledged in the world as the creator of a new branch in Semiotics, which is, generally speaking, the science of signs. But their contributions as Philosophers were not only restricted to Semiotics, for they performed large and complex systems, which assembled the main philosophical branches. Most of the work to relate both philosophies remains to be done. In fact, there are some connections that relate Peirce to Deleuze in the Contemporary Philosophy. Deleuze dedicated his first book, Empiricism and Subjectivity, in 1953, to Hume's thought, in a period when most of the French Philosophy was converted to Phenomenology or turned to the Structuralism. That is why Deleuze's contact with Peirce, which takes place only in his books about cinema, Cinema 1. image-mouvement (1983) and Cinema 2. image-temps (1985) , is neither casual nor opportunistic. In fact, their meeting is thoroughly engaged in a long trend, which runs along Deleuze's 29 books, performing the so-called Deleuzean Empiricism. Indeed, the main philosophical problem in the Deleuzean Empiricism is the theory of relations, which must be connected to the essential and fruitful Peirce's logic of relations. (AU)