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Phenotypic effects of mutations in regulatory regions of the genome in cattle

Grant number: 16/07584-6
Support type:Scholarships abroad - Research Internship - Doctorate
Effective date (Start): July 01, 2016
Effective date (End): March 31, 2017
Field of knowledge:Agronomical Sciences - Veterinary Medicine
Principal Investigator:Flavia Lombardi Lopes
Grantee:Mariângela Bueno Cordeiro Maldonado
Supervisor abroad: Jeremy Taylor
Home Institution: Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária (FMVA). Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP). Campus de Araçatuba. Araçatuba , SP, Brazil
Local de pesquisa : University of Missouri, Columbia (UM), United States  
Associated to the scholarship:15/20557-5 - Identification of SNPs in CpG sites located in genomic regions related to production in cattle, BP.DR

Abstract

Manifestation of cellular phenotypes and regulation of complex biological processes require transcriptional regulation of genes. Alteration of the interaction between chromatin components results in the deregulation of cellular transcriptional program, demonstrating that the chromatin plays a dynamic role in the transcriptional processes. However, the access of various transcriptional factors to the underlying DNA strand, depends on epigenetic alterations and mobilization of nucleosomes. The likelihood of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) being directly correlated with genes that enhance the expression of a trait of economic or health value, is analyzed by Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). Besides the regulation in expression levels, exerted by genomic features such as SNPs, several authors suggest that the relationship between gene expression levels and the epigenetic mechanism of DNA methylation, also depend on the genomic context in CpG sites. The main goal of the research proposal is to identify regions of the genome that regulate gene expression and how mutations in these regulatory regions might create phenotypic effects on resistance to infection by pathogens, as well as growth and feed efficiency in cattle. Results of this study will contribute to understand gene expression regulation and how mutations in regulatory regions of the genome can create phenotypic effects. (AU)