Advanced search
Start date
Betweenand

Canine obesity and inflammation: a study of microRNAs involved in the expression of macrophages in adipose tissue

Grant number: 18/26547-0
Support type:Scholarships in Brazil - Master
Effective date (Start): December 01, 2019
Effective date (End): November 30, 2021
Field of knowledge:Agronomical Sciences - Veterinary Medicine - Animal Clinics and Surgery
Principal Investigator:Deise Carla Almeida Leite Dellova
Grantee:Paola Caroline da Silva Nunes
Home Institution: Faculdade de Zootecnia e Engenharia de Alimentos (FZEA). Universidade de São Paulo (USP). Pirassununga , SP, Brazil
Associated research grant:14/22887-0 - Cell-secreted vesicles containing miRNAs modulate epigenetic changes during in vitro culture of bovine gametes and embryos, AP.JP

Abstract

The obese dogs present systemics and laboratory abnormalities compatible with inflammation. The expansion of white adipose tissue appears to be the key to the inflammatory process, in part by the infiltration of a large number of macrophages. The microRNAs (miRNAs) present in adipose tissue and circulating extracellular vesicles (VEs), appears to control this process in humans; however, similar studies have not been done in dogs. The objective of this project is to evaluate the in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of obese female dogs, compared to lean female dogs the infiltration of macrophages and the expression of the miRNAs (miR-26b, miR-155 and miR-132) and their respective target genes (MYCBP, SOCS1 and FOXO3), envolved with the modulation of macrophages invasion and inflammation by real-time PCR. The pattern (estructure and diameter) of the circulating VEs which carry miRNAs and participate in cellular communication, will also be determined in serum samples from the female dogs, using the ultracentrifugation technique and the NanoSightÒ equipment. The miR-26b, miR-155 and miR-132 expression will also be evaluated in VEs by real-time PCR. It is expected to correlate the expression of miRNAs and target genes with macrophages infiltrates in adipose tissue and the inflammatory process in obese female dogs. (AU)