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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

The level of relatedness affects self/nonself discrimination in Eucalyptus urophylla seedlings

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Author(s):
Bertoli, Suzana Chiari [1, 2] ; Neris, Daniel Moreira [3] ; Sala, Helida Regina [1] ; Vieira, Willyam De Lima [4] ; Souza, Gustavo Maia [5]
Total Authors: 5
Affiliation:
[1] Univ Western Sao Paulo, Res Ctr Plant Ecophysiol Western Sao Paulo, Rodovia Raposo Tavares 572 Km, Presidente Prudente 19067175, SP - Brazil
[2] Univ Western Sdo Paulo, Grad Program Environm & Reg Dev, Rodovia Raposo Tavares 572 Km, Presidente Prudente 19067175, SP - Brazil
[3] Univ Estadual Campinas, Biol Inst, Campinas 13083970, SP - Brazil
[4] Univ Estadual Paulista, Fac Ciencias Agron, Grad Program Forest Sci, Ave Univ 3780, Botucatu 18610034, SP - Brazil
[5] Univ Fed Pelotas, Bot Dept, Ave Eliseu Maciel, Campus Capao Do Leao 96160000, RS - Brazil
Total Affiliations: 5
Document type: Journal article
Source: CANADIAN JOURNAL OF FOREST RESEARCH-REVUE CANADIENNE DE RECHERCHE FORESTIER; v. 50, n. 5, p. 500-509, MAY 2020.
Web of Science Citations: 0
Abstract

Plants can develop differentially because of their ability of self/nonself discrimination and the degree of kinship among them. Here, we evaluate the ability of self/nonself discrimination of Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake roots in plant groups with different levels of relatedness. We used three plant groups: clonal, half-siblings, and population. Split-root plants were grown in pots containing either two roots of the same plant (S-D) or of two different plants (NSD). The growth of root and leaves of the half-siblings and population plants was decreased in NSD in relation to S-D, whereas this response was not observed in the clonal group. The multivariate analysis indicated that there was a progressive increase in plant responses likely caused by competitive interaction of roots, as the level of relatedness between individuals was lower. Our results suggest that the group of clonal plants minimized the competitive interaction among them, indicating low ability to discriminate from each other. However, half-sibling and populational plants reduced growth as a result of root competition, showing high capacity of self discrimination. Thus, a minimum degree of genetic variation between plants seems necessary for kin recognition to be expressed. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 11/21591-1 - Self/non-self reference capacity in the interaction dynamic among Eucalyptus urophylla seedlings under different environmental conditions
Grantee:Suzana Chiari Bertolli
Support type: Scholarships in Brazil - Doctorate