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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

Warming drives ecological community changes linked to host-associated microbiome dysbiosis

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Author(s):
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Greenspan, Sasha E. [1] ; Migliorini, Gustavo H. [2] ; Lyra, Mariana L. [3, 4] ; Pontes, Mariana R. [5, 6] ; Carvalho, Tamilie [5, 6] ; Ribeiro, Luisa P. [5, 6] ; Moura-Campos, Diego [5, 6] ; Haddad, Celio F. B. [3, 4] ; Toledo, Luis Felipe [5] ; Romero, Gustavo Q. [7] ; Becker, C. Guilherme [1]
Total Authors: 11
Affiliation:
[1] Univ Alabama, Dept Biol Sci, Tuscaloosa, AL - USA
[2] Univ Estadual Paulista, Programa Posgrad Biol Anim, Sao Jose Do Rio Preto - Brazil
[3] Univ Estadual Paulista, Dept Biodivers, Rio Claro - Brazil
[4] Univ Estadual Paulista, Aquaculture Ctr CAUNESP, Rio Claro - Brazil
[5] Univ Estadual Campinas, Dept Biol Anim, Lab Hist Nat Anfibios Brasileiros LaHNAB, Campinas - Brazil
[6] Univ Estadual Campinas, Inst Biol, Programa Posgrad Ecol, Campinas - Brazil
[7] Univ Estadual Campinas, Dept Biol Anim, Campinas - Brazil
Total Affiliations: 7
Document type: Journal article
Source: NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE; v. 10, n. 11, p. 1057+, NOV 2020.
Web of Science Citations: 2
Abstract

Replicated bromeliad microecosystems were used to examine warming-induced community shifts and changes to tadpole gut microbiome. Tadpole growth was more strongly associated with cascading effects of warming on gut dysbiosis than with direct warming effects or indirect effects on food resources. Anthropogenic climate warming affects many biological systems, ranging in scale from microbiomes to biomes. In many animals, warming-related fitness depression appears more closely linked to changes in ecological community interactions than to direct thermal stress. This biotic community framework is commonly applied to warming studies at the scale of ecosystems but is rarely applied at the scale of microbiomes. Here, we used replicated bromeliad microecosystems to show warming effects on tadpole gut microbiome dysbiosis mediated through biotic community interactions. Warming shifted environmental bacteria and arthropod community composition, with linkages to changes in microbial recruitment that promoted dysbiosis and stunted tadpole growth. Tadpole growth was more strongly associated with cascading effects of warming on gut dysbiosis than with direct warming effects or indirect effects on food resources. These results suggest that assessing warming effects on animal health requires an ecological community perspective on microbiome structure and function. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 18/23622-0 - Implications of national and international bullfrog trade in spread and tolerance acquired to chytrid fungus and conservation measures of anurans
Grantee:Luisa de Pontes Ribeiro
Support type: Scholarships in Brazil - Doctorate
FAPESP's process: 13/50741-7 - Diversity and conservation of Brazilian amphibians
Grantee:Célio Fernando Baptista Haddad
Support type: BIOTA-FAPESP Program - Thematic Grants
FAPESP's process: 17/09052-4 - Influence of latitude and aquatic subsidies on niche breadth and structure of terrestrial communities
Grantee:Gustavo Quevedo Romero
Support type: Regular Research Grants
FAPESP's process: 18/12225-0 - Unifying environmental and spatial determinants of food web structure across spatial scales
Grantee:Gustavo Quevedo Romero
Support type: BIOTA-FAPESP Program - Regular Research Grants
FAPESP's process: 16/25358-3 - The chytrid fungus: from its origins to its consequences
Grantee:Luis Felipe de Toledo Ramos Pereira
Support type: Research Projects - Thematic Grants
FAPESP's process: 17/26162-8 - Diversity and conservation of Brazilian amphibians
Grantee:Mariana Lúcio Lyra
Support type: Scholarships in Brazil - Technical Training Program - Technical Training
FAPESP's process: 19/18335-5 - Passive air transportation of an amphibian lethal pathogen in high elevation sites: practical applications for protected areas conservation in the State of São Paulo
Grantee:Luis Felipe de Toledo Ramos Pereira
Support type: BIOTA-FAPESP Program - Regular Research Grants