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Possible correlations between thyroid hormone and memory and learning processes in obese rat

Grant number: 14/15556-7
Support type:Scholarships in Brazil - Master
Effective date (Start): April 01, 2015
Effective date (End): July 31, 2016
Field of knowledge:Biological Sciences - Physiology - Physiology of Organs and Systems
Cooperation agreement: Coordination of Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES)
Principal Investigator:Miriam Oliveira Ribeiro
Grantee:Fernanda Beraldo Lorena
Home Institution: Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde (CCBS). Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie (UPM). Instituto Presbiteriano Mackenzie. São Paulo , SP, Brazil

Abstract

The thyroid hormone (TH) is essential for the development of various tissues and exerts a direct influence on the metabolism of all vertebrates. Secreted in the form of T4, which is considered the forerunner molecule is converted to T3, which is the physiologically active form of thyroid hormone. The deiodinases type 1, 2 and 3 are important for the regulation of the amount of T3 in tissues, and can then activate or inactivate the T4 to T3. D3 is the main inactivator of T3, causing local tissue hypothyroidism where it is expressed. The TH regulates the growth and development of the central nervous system by regulating the expression of genes such as BDNF and NT -3 that are related to brain plasticity. Obesity besides the health hazards, can harm the developing CNS, influencing the processes of memory and learning. The same neurotrophins regulated by T3 are also altered in obesity. Thus, our working hypothesis is based on the possibility of decreased T3 signaling in obese individuals, resulting in increased expression of brain D3, with consequent reduction in neurotrophins that lead to injury for memory and learning processes. To prove our hypothesis, we will evaluate the learning ability of Wistar rats fed with high calorie diet. We will also analyze the expression of the enzyme D3 by immunohistochemistry and the expression of TH regulated genesin the brain by real-time PCR. (AU)