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Amnestic mild cognitive impairment with increased risk factor for Alzheimer's Disease: effect of cardiorespiratory training on cerebral blood flow

Grant number: 15/19244-2
Support type:Scholarships abroad - Research Internship - Doctorate
Effective date (Start): March 29, 2016
Effective date (End): September 28, 2016
Field of knowledge:Health Sciences - Medicine
Principal Investigator:Marcio Luiz Figueredo Balthazar
Grantee:Camila Vieira Ligo Teixeira
Supervisor abroad: Emrah Duezel
Home Institution: Hospital de Clínicas (HC). Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP). Campinas , SP, Brazil
Local de pesquisa : German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Germany  
Associated to the scholarship:14/02359-9 - Amnestic mild cognitive impairment with increased risk factor for Alzheimer's Disease: effect of cardiorespiratory training on clinical parameters and functional and structural neuroimaging, BP.DR

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative disorder that causes cognitive impairment and dependence in activities of daily life. Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI) is a term used to diagnose patients with clinical decline in memory and with or without more cognitive domains, but with normal social and functional performance. These patients have a greater chance of developing AD. Arterial Spin Labelling (ASL) is a non-invasive magnetic resonance method that measures cerebral blood flow and is capable of quantifying brain perfusion. It seems that baseline measures of brain perfusion are predictive of cognitive decline and progression to dementia in older adults. Aerobic exercises seems to be effective in improving cognition and socio-functional activities in elderly, also is associated with increase CBF. Thus the aim of this study is to assess the effect of aerobic exercise in cerebral perfusion with amnestic MCI with biological evidence of increased risk for dementia in AD, hoping to obtain data to input assumptions about the actual effect of aerobic exercises on brain from this high risk dementia group. (AU)