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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

Isolated ingestion of caffeine and sodium bicarbonate on repeated sprint performance: A systematic review and meta-analysis

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Author(s):
Lopes-Silva, Joao P. [1, 2, 3] ; Choo, Hui C. [4] ; Franchini, Emerson [5, 2] ; Abbiss, Chris R. [4]
Total Authors: 4
Affiliation:
[1] UNINASSAU, Maceio, Alagoas - Brazil
[2] Univ Sao Paulo, High Intens Intermittent Exercise Physiol Res Grp, Sch Phys & Educ & Sport, Sao Paulo - Brazil
[3] Cesmac Univ Ctr, Sch Phys Educ, Rua Prof Angelo Neto 51, BR-57051530 Maceio, Alagoas - Brazil
[4] Edith Cowan Univ, CESSR, Sch Med & Hlth Sci, 270 Joondalup Dr, Joondalup, WA 6027 - Australia
[5] Australian Inst Sport, Canberra, ACT - Australia
Total Affiliations: 5
Document type: Review article
Source: JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND MEDICINE IN SPORT; v. 22, n. 8, p. 962-972, AUG 2019.
Web of Science Citations: 0
Abstract

Objectives: This study is a systematic review and meta-analysis aimed at investigating the isolated effects of caffeine and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) ingestion on repeated sprint ability (RSA). Methods: Following a search through PubMed and Scopus, 13 studies (7 with caffeine and 6 with NaHCO3) were found to meet inclusion criteria. Random-effects of standardized mean difference (SMD) for total work and best sprint performance was examined. Study quality was assessed using QualSyst. Results: The meta-analysis indicated that caffeine ingestion did not improve the total work done (weighted average effect size Hedges's g= -0.01, 95%CI: -0.32 to 0.31, p = 0.97), best sprint (weighted average effect size Hedges's g= -0.02, 95% CI: -0.32 to 0.27; p = 0.87) or last sprint performance (weighed average effect size Hedge's g = -0.27, 95%CI: -0.68 to 0.14; p = 0.20), when compared with a placebo condition. Similarly, NaHCO3 ingestion did not improve the total work done (weighted average effect size Hedges's g=0.43, 95% CI: -0.11 to 0.97, p=0.12), best sprint (weighted average effect size Hedges's g=0.02, 95% CI -0.30 to 0.34; p =0.90) or last sprint performance (weighted average effect size Hedge's g = 0.20, 95%CI: -0.13 to 0.52, p = 0.14), compared with a placebo condition. Quality assessment of selected articles was classified as strong. Conclusion: This meta-analysis provides evidence that repeated sprint ability is not affected by acute ingestion of caffeine or NaHCO3. (C) 2019 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 17/08167-2 - Pacing in judo
Grantee:Emerson Franchini
Support type: Scholarships abroad - Research