Advanced search
Start date
Betweenand

Toxicogenetics evaluation of the food colorings erythrosine and yellow quinoline and their products: electrochemical analysis and expressions of TP53 and COX-2 genes in liver cells

Grant number: 11/01755-0
Support type:Scholarships in Brazil - Post-Doctorate
Effective date (Start): August 01, 2011
Effective date (End): January 31, 2013
Field of knowledge:Health Sciences - Nutrition - Nutrition Biochemistry
Principal Investigator:Lusânia Maria Greggi Antunes
Grantee:Farah Maria Drumond Chequer
Home Institution: Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto (FCFRP). Universidade de São Paulo (USP). Ribeirão Preto , SP, Brazil
Associated research grant:08/10449-7 - Assessment of occurrence, toxicity/genotoxicity and degradation processes of dyes in effluents and surface water, AP.TEM

Abstract

The pigments and dyes are widely used in food industry, aiming to improve the presentation of the food to consumers. Natural and synthetic dyes are employed in the production of food and drink to compensate the loss of color during the manufacturing process and storage and also to assign color to those originally colorless. Currently, the use of synthetic dyes in food has been the target of several studies due to possible health risks and some were forbidden their use in many countries. However, investigations on the biological effects of food colorings and their products generated by biodegradation are limited, especially on the induction of genomic instability, such as induction of DNA damage and changes in gene expression. Due to the damage that synthetic dyes can cause to health, the goal of this research is to evaluate possible genomic instability induced by the dyes erythrosine and yellow quinoline in HepG2 cells (human hepatocellular carcinoma), which have similar morphology to the epithelium and the parenchyma of the human liver using the micronucleus test and comet assay, and to identify the expression profile of genes TP53 (tumor suppressor) and COX-2 enzyme (cyclooxygenase-2). In addition, we will analyze the products of oxidation and reduction of the dyes studied. Another aim is to elucidate the chemical structure of these compounds formed by HPLC-DAD and GC-MS and will be performed the photodynamic degradation of the dyes by UV light, visible and solar, in order to verify if the products will be more refractory to degradation, changing its potential to induce DNA damage. (AU)

Scientific publications
(References retrieved automatically from Web of Science and SciELO through information on FAPESP grants and their corresponding numbers as mentioned in the publications by the authors)
CHEQUER, FARAH M. D.; VENANCIO, VINICIUS P.; ALMEIDA, MARA R.; AISSA, ALEXANDRE F.; BIANCHI, MARIA LOURDES P.; ANTUNES, LUSANIA M. G. Erythrosine B and quinoline yellow dyes regulate DNA repair gene expression in human HepG2 cells. TOXICOLOGY AND INDUSTRIAL HEALTH, v. 33, n. 10, p. 765-774, OCT 2017. Web of Science Citations: 0.
DRUMOND CHEQUER, FARAH MARIA; VENANCIO, VINICIUS DE PAULA; DE SOUZA PRADO, MAIRA ROCHA; DA SILVA E CUNHA JUNIOR, LUIZ RAIMUNDO CAMPOS; LIZIER, THIAGO MESCOLOTO; BOLDRIN ZANONI, MARIA VALNICE; BURBANO, ROMMEL RODRIGUEZ; PIRES BIANCHI, MARIA LOURDES; GREGGI ANTUNES, LUSANIA MARIA. The cosmetic dye quinoline yellow causes DNA damage in vitro. MUTATION RESEARCH-GENETIC TOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MUTAGENESIS, v. 777, p. 54-61, JAN 1 2015. Web of Science Citations: 11.
DRUMOND CHEQUER, FARAH MARIA; VENANCIO, VINICIUS DE PAULA; BIANCHI, MARIA DE LOURDES PIRES; GREGGI ANTUNES, LUSANIA MARIA. Genotoxic and mutagenic effects of erythrosine B, a xanthene food dye, on HepG2 cells. Food and Chemical Toxicology, v. 50, n. 10, p. 3447-3451, OCT 2012. Web of Science Citations: 25.

Please report errors in scientific publications list by writing to: cdi@fapesp.br.